Corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication and small and medium sized enterprises : The governmentality dilemma of explicit and implicit CSR communication. / Morsing, Mette; Spence, Laura.

In: Human Relations, Vol. 72, No. 12, 01.12.2019, p. 1920-1947.

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Corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication and small and medium sized enterprises : The governmentality dilemma of explicit and implicit CSR communication. / Morsing, Mette; Spence, Laura.

In: Human Relations, Vol. 72, No. 12, 01.12.2019, p. 1920-1947.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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@article{f0140474efa7463f96d45bba6ba47c4e,
title = "Corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication and small and medium sized enterprises: The governmentality dilemma of explicit and implicit CSR communication",
abstract = "Businesses that promote corporate social responsibility (CSR) through their supply chain by requiring their suppliers to report on and otherwise communicate their CSR are doing a great thing, aren{\textquoteright}t they? In this article we challenge this assumption by focusing on the impact on small and medium sized enterprise (SME) suppliers when their large customers pressurise them to make their implicit CSR communication more explicit. We expose a {\textquoteleft}dark side{\textquoteright} to assumed improvements in CSR reporting within a supply chain. We present a conceptual framework that draws on previous research on communication constitutes organization theory, implicit and explicit CSR, and Foucault{\textquoteright}s governmentality. We identify and discuss the implications of three resulting dilemmas faced by SMEs: authenticity commercialization, values control, and identity disruption. The overarching contribution of our paper is to extend theorizing on CSR communication and conceptual research on CSR in SME suppliers (small business social responsibility). From a practice and policy perspective, it is not ultimately clear that promoting CSR reporting among SMEs will necessarily improve socially responsible practice. ",
keywords = "Authenticity, CCO, communication constitutes organization, corporate social responsibility, CSR, CSR communication, identity, governmentality, small business, small business social responsibility, SMEs, supply chain, values, explicit CSR , implicit CSR",
author = "Mette Morsing and Laura Spence",
year = "2019",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0018726718804306",
language = "English",
volume = "72",
pages = "1920--1947",
journal = "Human Relations",
issn = "0018-7267",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication and small and medium sized enterprises

T2 - The governmentality dilemma of explicit and implicit CSR communication

AU - Morsing, Mette

AU - Spence, Laura

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Businesses that promote corporate social responsibility (CSR) through their supply chain by requiring their suppliers to report on and otherwise communicate their CSR are doing a great thing, aren’t they? In this article we challenge this assumption by focusing on the impact on small and medium sized enterprise (SME) suppliers when their large customers pressurise them to make their implicit CSR communication more explicit. We expose a ‘dark side’ to assumed improvements in CSR reporting within a supply chain. We present a conceptual framework that draws on previous research on communication constitutes organization theory, implicit and explicit CSR, and Foucault’s governmentality. We identify and discuss the implications of three resulting dilemmas faced by SMEs: authenticity commercialization, values control, and identity disruption. The overarching contribution of our paper is to extend theorizing on CSR communication and conceptual research on CSR in SME suppliers (small business social responsibility). From a practice and policy perspective, it is not ultimately clear that promoting CSR reporting among SMEs will necessarily improve socially responsible practice.

AB - Businesses that promote corporate social responsibility (CSR) through their supply chain by requiring their suppliers to report on and otherwise communicate their CSR are doing a great thing, aren’t they? In this article we challenge this assumption by focusing on the impact on small and medium sized enterprise (SME) suppliers when their large customers pressurise them to make their implicit CSR communication more explicit. We expose a ‘dark side’ to assumed improvements in CSR reporting within a supply chain. We present a conceptual framework that draws on previous research on communication constitutes organization theory, implicit and explicit CSR, and Foucault’s governmentality. We identify and discuss the implications of three resulting dilemmas faced by SMEs: authenticity commercialization, values control, and identity disruption. The overarching contribution of our paper is to extend theorizing on CSR communication and conceptual research on CSR in SME suppliers (small business social responsibility). From a practice and policy perspective, it is not ultimately clear that promoting CSR reporting among SMEs will necessarily improve socially responsible practice.

KW - Authenticity

KW - CCO

KW - communication constitutes organization

KW - corporate social responsibility

KW - CSR

KW - CSR communication

KW - identity

KW - governmentality

KW - small business

KW - small business social responsibility

KW - SMEs

KW - supply chain

KW - values

KW - explicit CSR

KW - implicit CSR

U2 - 10.1177/0018726718804306

DO - 10.1177/0018726718804306

M3 - Article

VL - 72

SP - 1920

EP - 1947

JO - Human Relations

JF - Human Relations

SN - 0018-7267

IS - 12

ER -