The relationship between beliefs about emotions and quality of life in irritable bowel syndrome. / Bowers, Hannah; Wroe, Abigail; Pincus, Tamar.

In: Psychology, Health and Medicine, 22.03.2017, p. 1-7.

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Abstract

Suppression of undesirable emotions, as well as beliefs about the unacceptability of experiencing and expressing emotions, have both been shown to be related to poorer health-related outcomes in several clinical groups. Potential models through which these variables relate have yet to be tested in those with irritable bowel syndrome and are therefore examined in the current article. Online
questionnaires were administered to people with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (n=84) to test a mediation model in which beliefs about the unacceptability of emotions are associated with greater emotional suppression, which in turn relates to increased affective distress and consequently poorer quality of life. An alternate model to test the direction of effect along with two further models using support-seeking as mediators of the same predictor and outcome were also tested. Emotional suppression and affective distress (in that particular order) mediate the relationship between beliefs about emotions and quality of life IBS. The models using support-seeking as mediators of the relationship between beliefs about emotions and the two outcomes were not supported. These findings suggest a role for emotional processing in medically unexplained symptoms and imply the need to address such beliefs about emotions in psychological therapies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalPsychology, Health and Medicine
Early online date22 Mar 2017
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - 22 Mar 2017
This open access research output is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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