Dr Michael Evangeli

Research interests

 

My main research interests relate to psychological and behavioural aspects of HIV. There are five main inter-related themes to this work:

 

  1. HIV testing. I have supervised doctoral projects on late and delayed HIV testing in HIV positive individuals from sub-Saharan African origins, and child HIV testing decision-making in mothers diagnosed with HIV. I am currently supervising doctoral project on home and primary care HIV testing (jointly with Dr. Michael Brady) and am carrying out/have carried out a series of systematic reviews of psychological correlates of HIV testing with a view to developing a psychological model of self-initiated HIV testing.
  2. HIV-related behaviour change. I was a Co-Investigator on a multi-centre UK MRC-funded randomized feasibility trial of a computerized behavioural STI secondary prevention intervention. My motivational interviewing (MI) work in the UK and South Africa addressed sexual risk behaviour and other health behaviour decision-making and I have supervised a doctoral study on intimate relationships in young people with perinatally acquired HIV that explored sexual decision-making. I am currently supervising a doctoral project on medication adherence and its relationship to MI within-session processes in HIV-positive individuals (along with colleagues at the University of Kansas).
  3. Psychological elements to individuals’ engagement with HIV care. I carried out a project on psychosocial predictors of loss-to-follow up in HIV care in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. I have supervised a doctoral project on situational correlates of antiretroviral adherence in young people with perinatally acquired HIV and am due to be supervising a doctoral project on PREP adherence.
  4. Well-being and adjustment in HIV. I have supervised or am supervising doctoral theses on well-being in perinatally infected HIV positive adolescents, relationship issues in perinatally infected HIV positive young adults, sibling relationships in perinatally infected HIV+ young people, friendships in both behaviourally and perinatally infected HIV+ young people, religion and adjustment in recently diagnosed HIV positive individuals from Sub-Saharan Africa, post natal bonding with infants in the context of an HIV diagnosis during pregnancy, and parenting issues in parents who are perinatally infected with HIV. I have been funded (as PI) to evaluate a residential intervention for young people living with HIV (ViiV Healthcare UK).
  5. HIV disclosure and HIV communication. I am planning an onward HIV disclosure intervention in young people with perinatally acquried HIV along with colleagues at St. Mary's Hospital, London, and Makwere University, Kampala, Uganda. I have developed a theoretical model of paediatric HIV disclosure with Professor Ashraf Kagee from Stellenbosch University, South Africa and a model of HIV disclosure anxiety with Dr. Abi Wroe. I supervised a doctoral project on post-naming HIV familial communication in adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV.

 

ID: 19761