'You know I am all on fire' : writing the adulterous affair in England, c.1740–1830. / Holloway, Sally.

In: Historical Research, Vol. 89, No. 244, 05.2016, p. 317-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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'You know I am all on fire' : writing the adulterous affair in England, c.1740–1830. / Holloway, Sally.

In: Historical Research, Vol. 89, No. 244, 05.2016, p. 317-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Holloway, Sally. / 'You know I am all on fire' : writing the adulterous affair in England, c.1740–1830. In: Historical Research. 2016 ; Vol. 89, No. 244. pp. 317-339.

BibTeX

@article{b095aa14fa8447649123893406f7241d,
title = "'You know I am all on fire': writing the adulterous affair in England, c.1740–1830",
abstract = "This article analyses rare surviving adulterous love letters alongside published epistles and trial reports to reveal the practical and emotional importance of letter-writing in conducting an affair in England c.1740–1830. While attitudes to adultery have received widespread scholarly attention, illicit letters remain largely overlooked. The article is the first to outline distinguishing features of adulterous letters, and the language of infidelity. It distinguishes missives from courtship letters as a secretive genre carefully shielded by writers. By scrutinizing the letters which sustained affairs, the article rediscovers the happiness, jealousy and desire of illicit love in the words of lovers themselves.",
author = "Sally Holloway",
year = "2016",
month = may,
doi = "10.1111/1468-2281.12130",
language = "English",
volume = "89",
pages = "317--339",
journal = "Historical Research",
issn = "0950-3471",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "244",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'You know I am all on fire'

T2 - writing the adulterous affair in England, c.1740–1830

AU - Holloway, Sally

PY - 2016/5

Y1 - 2016/5

N2 - This article analyses rare surviving adulterous love letters alongside published epistles and trial reports to reveal the practical and emotional importance of letter-writing in conducting an affair in England c.1740–1830. While attitudes to adultery have received widespread scholarly attention, illicit letters remain largely overlooked. The article is the first to outline distinguishing features of adulterous letters, and the language of infidelity. It distinguishes missives from courtship letters as a secretive genre carefully shielded by writers. By scrutinizing the letters which sustained affairs, the article rediscovers the happiness, jealousy and desire of illicit love in the words of lovers themselves.

AB - This article analyses rare surviving adulterous love letters alongside published epistles and trial reports to reveal the practical and emotional importance of letter-writing in conducting an affair in England c.1740–1830. While attitudes to adultery have received widespread scholarly attention, illicit letters remain largely overlooked. The article is the first to outline distinguishing features of adulterous letters, and the language of infidelity. It distinguishes missives from courtship letters as a secretive genre carefully shielded by writers. By scrutinizing the letters which sustained affairs, the article rediscovers the happiness, jealousy and desire of illicit love in the words of lovers themselves.

U2 - 10.1111/1468-2281.12130

DO - 10.1111/1468-2281.12130

M3 - Article

VL - 89

SP - 317

EP - 339

JO - Historical Research

JF - Historical Research

SN - 0950-3471

IS - 244

ER -