Where is the body in the costume design process? / Dean, Sally.

In: Studies in Costume & Performance , Vol. 1, No. 1, 01.04.2016, p. 97-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Where is the body in the costume design process? / Dean, Sally.

In: Studies in Costume & Performance , Vol. 1, No. 1, 01.04.2016, p. 97-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Dean, S 2016, 'Where is the body in the costume design process?', Studies in Costume & Performance , vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 97-111. https://doi.org/10.1386/scp.1.1.97_1

APA

Vancouver

Dean S. Where is the body in the costume design process? Studies in Costume & Performance . 2016 Apr 1;1(1):97-111. https://doi.org/10.1386/scp.1.1.97_1

Author

Dean, Sally. / Where is the body in the costume design process?. In: Studies in Costume & Performance . 2016 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. 97-111.

BibTeX

@article{203d9fca4be74ce2bde7a7c4d7ee249c,
title = "Where is the body in the costume design process?",
abstract = "Sally E. Dean has led the Somatic Movement, Costume & Performance Project in collaboration with costume designers/visual artists Sandra Arr{\`o}niz Lacunza and Carolina Rieckhof since 2011. This project offers an alternative costume design methodology that starts from the body or {\textquoteleft}soma{\textquoteright} (i.e. a sentient, perceiving person), whereby perception is inherently active and relational. This approach is thus multi-sensorial, somatic and holistic, and is based upon Sally{\textquoteright}s background as a somatic practitioner, performer, performance-maker and teacher. This visual essay gives examples from the project{\textquoteright}s design approach, working with a live, moving and multi-sensorial body to create Somatic CostumesTM through co-creation, collaboration and participation. Costume designers are actively engaged in trying on materials and costumes through all stages of the process in order to answer the following overarching question: what are the materials/costumes doing to the body (i.e. body image and body schema)? Through these experiential methodologies, the project aims to return and relocate the body into the costume design process.",
author = "Sally Dean",
year = "2016",
month = apr,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1386/scp.1.1.97_1",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "97--111",
journal = "Studies in Costume & Performance ",
issn = "2052-4013",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Where is the body in the costume design process?

AU - Dean, Sally

PY - 2016/4/1

Y1 - 2016/4/1

N2 - Sally E. Dean has led the Somatic Movement, Costume & Performance Project in collaboration with costume designers/visual artists Sandra Arròniz Lacunza and Carolina Rieckhof since 2011. This project offers an alternative costume design methodology that starts from the body or ‘soma’ (i.e. a sentient, perceiving person), whereby perception is inherently active and relational. This approach is thus multi-sensorial, somatic and holistic, and is based upon Sally’s background as a somatic practitioner, performer, performance-maker and teacher. This visual essay gives examples from the project’s design approach, working with a live, moving and multi-sensorial body to create Somatic CostumesTM through co-creation, collaboration and participation. Costume designers are actively engaged in trying on materials and costumes through all stages of the process in order to answer the following overarching question: what are the materials/costumes doing to the body (i.e. body image and body schema)? Through these experiential methodologies, the project aims to return and relocate the body into the costume design process.

AB - Sally E. Dean has led the Somatic Movement, Costume & Performance Project in collaboration with costume designers/visual artists Sandra Arròniz Lacunza and Carolina Rieckhof since 2011. This project offers an alternative costume design methodology that starts from the body or ‘soma’ (i.e. a sentient, perceiving person), whereby perception is inherently active and relational. This approach is thus multi-sensorial, somatic and holistic, and is based upon Sally’s background as a somatic practitioner, performer, performance-maker and teacher. This visual essay gives examples from the project’s design approach, working with a live, moving and multi-sensorial body to create Somatic CostumesTM through co-creation, collaboration and participation. Costume designers are actively engaged in trying on materials and costumes through all stages of the process in order to answer the following overarching question: what are the materials/costumes doing to the body (i.e. body image and body schema)? Through these experiential methodologies, the project aims to return and relocate the body into the costume design process.

U2 - 10.1386/scp.1.1.97_1

DO - 10.1386/scp.1.1.97_1

M3 - Article

VL - 1

SP - 97

EP - 111

JO - Studies in Costume & Performance

JF - Studies in Costume & Performance

SN - 2052-4013

IS - 1

ER -