What a Difference a Critical Election Makes : Social Networks and Political Discussion in Italy Between 2008 and 2013. / Campus, Donatella; Ceccarini, Luigi; Vaccari, Cristian.

In: International Journal of Public Opinion Research, Vol. 27, No. 4, 02.12.2015, p. 588-601.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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What a Difference a Critical Election Makes : Social Networks and Political Discussion in Italy Between 2008 and 2013. / Campus, Donatella; Ceccarini, Luigi; Vaccari, Cristian.

In: International Journal of Public Opinion Research, Vol. 27, No. 4, 02.12.2015, p. 588-601.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Campus, D, Ceccarini, L & Vaccari, C 2015, 'What a Difference a Critical Election Makes: Social Networks and Political Discussion in Italy Between 2008 and 2013', International Journal of Public Opinion Research, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 588-601. https://doi.org/10.1093/ijpor/edv045

APA

Vancouver

Author

Campus, Donatella ; Ceccarini, Luigi ; Vaccari, Cristian. / What a Difference a Critical Election Makes : Social Networks and Political Discussion in Italy Between 2008 and 2013. In: International Journal of Public Opinion Research. 2015 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 588-601.

BibTeX

@article{fefd807de3f8423da950d663a5433028,
title = "What a Difference a Critical Election Makes: Social Networks and Political Discussion in Italy Between 2008 and 2013",
abstract = "This article offers an analysis of the factors associated with frequency of political discussion among representative samples of Italian voters during the general election campaigns of 2008 and 2013. This diachronic comparison allows us to assess how political discussion was shaped in two campaigns characterized by widely different opinion climates, with the 2013 one marked by widespread political disaffection. Our findings show that political discussion notably increased in 2013 and the factors driving political conversations changed substantially. Whereas in 2008 those who voted out of protest and were part of politically homogeneous groups were less likely to talk about politics than the rest of the sample, in 2013 the interaction between protest voting and network homogeneity strongly boosted political discussion.",
keywords = "social networks, political discussion, network homogeneity, election campaigns",
author = "Donatella Campus and Luigi Ceccarini and Cristian Vaccari",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1093/ijpor/edv045",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "588--601",
journal = "International Journal of Public Opinion Research",
issn = "0954-2892",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - What a Difference a Critical Election Makes

T2 - Social Networks and Political Discussion in Italy Between 2008 and 2013

AU - Campus, Donatella

AU - Ceccarini, Luigi

AU - Vaccari, Cristian

PY - 2015/12/2

Y1 - 2015/12/2

N2 - This article offers an analysis of the factors associated with frequency of political discussion among representative samples of Italian voters during the general election campaigns of 2008 and 2013. This diachronic comparison allows us to assess how political discussion was shaped in two campaigns characterized by widely different opinion climates, with the 2013 one marked by widespread political disaffection. Our findings show that political discussion notably increased in 2013 and the factors driving political conversations changed substantially. Whereas in 2008 those who voted out of protest and were part of politically homogeneous groups were less likely to talk about politics than the rest of the sample, in 2013 the interaction between protest voting and network homogeneity strongly boosted political discussion.

AB - This article offers an analysis of the factors associated with frequency of political discussion among representative samples of Italian voters during the general election campaigns of 2008 and 2013. This diachronic comparison allows us to assess how political discussion was shaped in two campaigns characterized by widely different opinion climates, with the 2013 one marked by widespread political disaffection. Our findings show that political discussion notably increased in 2013 and the factors driving political conversations changed substantially. Whereas in 2008 those who voted out of protest and were part of politically homogeneous groups were less likely to talk about politics than the rest of the sample, in 2013 the interaction between protest voting and network homogeneity strongly boosted political discussion.

KW - social networks

KW - political discussion

KW - network homogeneity

KW - election campaigns

U2 - 10.1093/ijpor/edv045

DO - 10.1093/ijpor/edv045

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 588

EP - 601

JO - International Journal of Public Opinion Research

JF - International Journal of Public Opinion Research

SN - 0954-2892

IS - 4

ER -