Was it you who died, or your brother? / Baldwin, Hannah.

In: Humor, 27.05.2019.

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Was it you who died, or your brother? / Baldwin, Hannah.

In: Humor, 27.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{e550658aa3e042d8baa6de96f3e9724e,
title = "Was it you who died, or your brother?",
abstract = "This paper seeks to apply Christie Davies' target theory to the classical jokebook Philogelos and more specifically, its most common protagonist, the scholastikos, whose central flaw is stupidity caused by his inability to interact with material reality, similar to modern {"}dotty professor{"} jokes. This paper seeks to build a model of how scholastikos jokes work, how the stereotype is constructed and perpetuated, how this differs from other {"}stupid{"} stereotypes used elsewhere in the Philogelos (largely ethnic-based stereotypes), and possible social and cultural anxieties bound up in the character of the scholastikos. It will explore the relationship between ancient and modern targets in light of Christie Davies' target theory and extend this model of how humour functions to transhistorical case studies.",
keywords = "Christie Davies, classical humor, jokebook, Philogelos, target theory",
author = "Hannah Baldwin",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "27",
doi = "10.1515/humor-2018-0084",
language = "English",
journal = "Humor",
issn = "0933-1719",
publisher = "De Gruyter Mouton",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Was it you who died, or your brother?

AU - Baldwin, Hannah

PY - 2019/5/27

Y1 - 2019/5/27

N2 - This paper seeks to apply Christie Davies' target theory to the classical jokebook Philogelos and more specifically, its most common protagonist, the scholastikos, whose central flaw is stupidity caused by his inability to interact with material reality, similar to modern "dotty professor" jokes. This paper seeks to build a model of how scholastikos jokes work, how the stereotype is constructed and perpetuated, how this differs from other "stupid" stereotypes used elsewhere in the Philogelos (largely ethnic-based stereotypes), and possible social and cultural anxieties bound up in the character of the scholastikos. It will explore the relationship between ancient and modern targets in light of Christie Davies' target theory and extend this model of how humour functions to transhistorical case studies.

AB - This paper seeks to apply Christie Davies' target theory to the classical jokebook Philogelos and more specifically, its most common protagonist, the scholastikos, whose central flaw is stupidity caused by his inability to interact with material reality, similar to modern "dotty professor" jokes. This paper seeks to build a model of how scholastikos jokes work, how the stereotype is constructed and perpetuated, how this differs from other "stupid" stereotypes used elsewhere in the Philogelos (largely ethnic-based stereotypes), and possible social and cultural anxieties bound up in the character of the scholastikos. It will explore the relationship between ancient and modern targets in light of Christie Davies' target theory and extend this model of how humour functions to transhistorical case studies.

KW - Christie Davies

KW - classical humor

KW - jokebook

KW - Philogelos

KW - target theory

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062207961&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1515/humor-2018-0084

DO - 10.1515/humor-2018-0084

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85062207961

JO - Humor

JF - Humor

SN - 0933-1719

ER -