Walking the Line : The Everyday Security Ties that Bind. / Coles-Kemp, Lizzie; Rydhof Hansen, René.

Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy and Trust: 5th International Conference, HAS 2017, Held as Part of HCI International 2017, Vancouver, BC, Canada, July 9-14, 2017, Proceedings. Vol. 10292 Springer, 2017. p. 464-480 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 10292).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Published

Standard

Walking the Line : The Everyday Security Ties that Bind. / Coles-Kemp, Lizzie; Rydhof Hansen, René.

Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy and Trust: 5th International Conference, HAS 2017, Held as Part of HCI International 2017, Vancouver, BC, Canada, July 9-14, 2017, Proceedings. Vol. 10292 Springer, 2017. p. 464-480 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 10292).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Harvard

Coles-Kemp, L & Rydhof Hansen, R 2017, Walking the Line: The Everyday Security Ties that Bind. in Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy and Trust: 5th International Conference, HAS 2017, Held as Part of HCI International 2017, Vancouver, BC, Canada, July 9-14, 2017, Proceedings. vol. 10292, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 10292, Springer, pp. 464-480. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-58460-7_32

APA

Coles-Kemp, L., & Rydhof Hansen, R. (2017). Walking the Line: The Everyday Security Ties that Bind. In Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy and Trust: 5th International Conference, HAS 2017, Held as Part of HCI International 2017, Vancouver, BC, Canada, July 9-14, 2017, Proceedings (Vol. 10292, pp. 464-480). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 10292). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-58460-7_32

Vancouver

Coles-Kemp L, Rydhof Hansen R. Walking the Line: The Everyday Security Ties that Bind. In Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy and Trust: 5th International Conference, HAS 2017, Held as Part of HCI International 2017, Vancouver, BC, Canada, July 9-14, 2017, Proceedings. Vol. 10292. Springer. 2017. p. 464-480. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-58460-7_32

Author

Coles-Kemp, Lizzie ; Rydhof Hansen, René. / Walking the Line : The Everyday Security Ties that Bind. Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy and Trust: 5th International Conference, HAS 2017, Held as Part of HCI International 2017, Vancouver, BC, Canada, July 9-14, 2017, Proceedings. Vol. 10292 Springer, 2017. pp. 464-480 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science).

BibTeX

@inproceedings{2bafd0689b3d44b9a1b4aaa25f28cf70,
title = "Walking the Line: The Everyday Security Ties that Bind",
abstract = "In this paper we argue that in contemporary society a form of security emerges that is qualitatively neither technological nor social but that is truly sociotechnical. We argue that everyday security is a form of sociotechnical security co-constituted of both technological protection mechanisms designed to protect assets and of relational social practices that enable people to build and maintain trust in their daily interactions. We further argue that the complexity of real-world information security problems requires security models that are able to articulate and examine security as a sociotechnical phenomenon and that can articulate and examine the results of interaction between these two security constructions. Security must be modelled to acknowledge, at least, the connection between an individual{\textquoteright}s security needs and the protection of assets if it is to help design secure services with which citizens can safely engage. We exemplify these attributes from case studies conducted as part of two sociotechnical research projects: the UK government and research council funded Cyber Security Cartographies (CySeCa) project and the EU FP7 funded project TREsPASS. These are introduced to discuss the potential for a family of modelling techniques. In this paper we examine the attributes of everyday security problems and reflect upon how such a modelling family might influence both academic research and practice in contemporary information security.",
author = "Lizzie Coles-Kemp and {Rydhof Hansen}, Ren{\'e}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-58460-7_32",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-3-319-58459-1",
volume = "10292",
series = "Lecture Notes in Computer Science",
publisher = "Springer",
pages = "464--480",
booktitle = "Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy and Trust",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Walking the Line

T2 - The Everyday Security Ties that Bind

AU - Coles-Kemp, Lizzie

AU - Rydhof Hansen, René

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - In this paper we argue that in contemporary society a form of security emerges that is qualitatively neither technological nor social but that is truly sociotechnical. We argue that everyday security is a form of sociotechnical security co-constituted of both technological protection mechanisms designed to protect assets and of relational social practices that enable people to build and maintain trust in their daily interactions. We further argue that the complexity of real-world information security problems requires security models that are able to articulate and examine security as a sociotechnical phenomenon and that can articulate and examine the results of interaction between these two security constructions. Security must be modelled to acknowledge, at least, the connection between an individual’s security needs and the protection of assets if it is to help design secure services with which citizens can safely engage. We exemplify these attributes from case studies conducted as part of two sociotechnical research projects: the UK government and research council funded Cyber Security Cartographies (CySeCa) project and the EU FP7 funded project TREsPASS. These are introduced to discuss the potential for a family of modelling techniques. In this paper we examine the attributes of everyday security problems and reflect upon how such a modelling family might influence both academic research and practice in contemporary information security.

AB - In this paper we argue that in contemporary society a form of security emerges that is qualitatively neither technological nor social but that is truly sociotechnical. We argue that everyday security is a form of sociotechnical security co-constituted of both technological protection mechanisms designed to protect assets and of relational social practices that enable people to build and maintain trust in their daily interactions. We further argue that the complexity of real-world information security problems requires security models that are able to articulate and examine security as a sociotechnical phenomenon and that can articulate and examine the results of interaction between these two security constructions. Security must be modelled to acknowledge, at least, the connection between an individual’s security needs and the protection of assets if it is to help design secure services with which citizens can safely engage. We exemplify these attributes from case studies conducted as part of two sociotechnical research projects: the UK government and research council funded Cyber Security Cartographies (CySeCa) project and the EU FP7 funded project TREsPASS. These are introduced to discuss the potential for a family of modelling techniques. In this paper we examine the attributes of everyday security problems and reflect upon how such a modelling family might influence both academic research and practice in contemporary information security.

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-319-58460-7_32

DO - 10.1007/978-3-319-58460-7_32

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 978-3-319-58459-1

VL - 10292

T3 - Lecture Notes in Computer Science

SP - 464

EP - 480

BT - Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy and Trust

PB - Springer

ER -