Understanding conduct disorder: The ways in which mothers attempt to make sense of their children's behaviour. / Lewis, Rhiannon; Petch, Vikky; Wilson, Naomi; Fox, Simone; Craig, Catrina.

In: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 13.06.2014, p. 1-15.

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Understanding conduct disorder: The ways in which mothers attempt to make sense of their children's behaviour. / Lewis, Rhiannon; Petch, Vikky; Wilson, Naomi; Fox, Simone; Craig, Catrina.

In: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 13.06.2014, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Lewis, Rhiannon ; Petch, Vikky ; Wilson, Naomi ; Fox, Simone ; Craig, Catrina. / Understanding conduct disorder: The ways in which mothers attempt to make sense of their children's behaviour. In: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry. 2014 ; pp. 1-15.

BibTeX

@article{60a507f6199f4654a21c290d77643441,
title = "Understanding conduct disorder: The ways in which mothers attempt to make sense of their children's behaviour",
abstract = "'Disruptive behaviour disorders{\textquoteright} are the most common reason for referral to CAMHS (Puckering, 2009). Current treatment guidelines focus on parent training programmes (NICE, 2006; CYP IAPT, 2012). Difficulties are often reported when engaging families, with parental attributions and attitudes towards help-seeking proposed as influential factors (Morrissey-Kane & Prinz, 1999; Kane et al., 2007). Previous research has tended to privilege pre-existing frameworks; this study utilised qualitative methods to add to the current understanding of the ways in which parents make sense of their children{\textquoteright}s behaviour. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with six mothers, recruited through CAMHS. IPA revealed four master themes: {\textquoteleft}Looking for an answer{\textquoteright}, {\textquoteleft}The emotional experience of being a parent{\textquoteright}, {\textquoteleft}Trying to get help{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}…a long, long road…{\textquoteright} Participants used a variety of frameworks in order to make sense of their children{\textquoteright}s behaviour, including the impact of loss and trauma. Help-seeking was associated with feelings of shame and services were often viewed as inconsistent and stigmatising. In contrast, positive experiences were those which were characterised as being non-judgemental, normalising and took into account the wider family context, including mothers{\textquoteright} own emotional needs. These findings were discussed in relation to existing research and implications for clinical practice.",
author = "Rhiannon Lewis and Vikky Petch and Naomi Wilson and Simone Fox and Catrina Craig",
year = "2014",
month = jun,
day = "13",
doi = "10.1177/1359104514538040",
language = "English",
pages = "1--15",
journal = "Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry",
issn = "1359-1045",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Understanding conduct disorder: The ways in which mothers attempt to make sense of their children's behaviour

AU - Lewis, Rhiannon

AU - Petch, Vikky

AU - Wilson, Naomi

AU - Fox, Simone

AU - Craig, Catrina

PY - 2014/6/13

Y1 - 2014/6/13

N2 - 'Disruptive behaviour disorders’ are the most common reason for referral to CAMHS (Puckering, 2009). Current treatment guidelines focus on parent training programmes (NICE, 2006; CYP IAPT, 2012). Difficulties are often reported when engaging families, with parental attributions and attitudes towards help-seeking proposed as influential factors (Morrissey-Kane & Prinz, 1999; Kane et al., 2007). Previous research has tended to privilege pre-existing frameworks; this study utilised qualitative methods to add to the current understanding of the ways in which parents make sense of their children’s behaviour. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with six mothers, recruited through CAMHS. IPA revealed four master themes: ‘Looking for an answer’, ‘The emotional experience of being a parent’, ‘Trying to get help’ and ‘…a long, long road…’ Participants used a variety of frameworks in order to make sense of their children’s behaviour, including the impact of loss and trauma. Help-seeking was associated with feelings of shame and services were often viewed as inconsistent and stigmatising. In contrast, positive experiences were those which were characterised as being non-judgemental, normalising and took into account the wider family context, including mothers’ own emotional needs. These findings were discussed in relation to existing research and implications for clinical practice.

AB - 'Disruptive behaviour disorders’ are the most common reason for referral to CAMHS (Puckering, 2009). Current treatment guidelines focus on parent training programmes (NICE, 2006; CYP IAPT, 2012). Difficulties are often reported when engaging families, with parental attributions and attitudes towards help-seeking proposed as influential factors (Morrissey-Kane & Prinz, 1999; Kane et al., 2007). Previous research has tended to privilege pre-existing frameworks; this study utilised qualitative methods to add to the current understanding of the ways in which parents make sense of their children’s behaviour. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with six mothers, recruited through CAMHS. IPA revealed four master themes: ‘Looking for an answer’, ‘The emotional experience of being a parent’, ‘Trying to get help’ and ‘…a long, long road…’ Participants used a variety of frameworks in order to make sense of their children’s behaviour, including the impact of loss and trauma. Help-seeking was associated with feelings of shame and services were often viewed as inconsistent and stigmatising. In contrast, positive experiences were those which were characterised as being non-judgemental, normalising and took into account the wider family context, including mothers’ own emotional needs. These findings were discussed in relation to existing research and implications for clinical practice.

U2 - 10.1177/1359104514538040

DO - 10.1177/1359104514538040

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 15

JO - Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry

JF - Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry

SN - 1359-1045

ER -