Traumatic brain injury and violent behavior in females : A systematic review. / Michelle, O'Sullivan; Glorney, Emily; Annette, Sterr; Oddy, Mike; de Silva Ramos, Sara.

In: Aggression and Violent Behavior, Vol. 25, No. A, 11.2015, p. 54-64.

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  • O'Sullivan Michelle
  • Emily Glorney
  • Sterr Annette
  • Mike Oddy
  • Sara de Silva Ramos

Abstract

Background: Research on causes and consequences of neurodisability has established a positive link between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and risk of violence among males. The nature and contribution of TBI to violence risk in females is equivocal and research with females is under-represented in the domain. The primary objective of this paper was to systematically review the strength of results of empirical research into the relationship be- tween TBI and violence in females.
Methods: Three databases were searched (PsychINFO, Scopus, and PubMed) and supplemented with citation searches (until February, 2013). Methodological rigor was appraised using the Cochrane Handbook's general guidance on non-experimental studies. Results: Only six of 153 identified papers met inclusion criteria. Three studies provided evidence of a positive relationship between violence and TBI in females specifically. The remain- ing found no significant gender differences between levels of post-TBI violence, suggesting females exhibit sim- ilar levels of violence to males. The studies contribute knowledge of other factors that may influence post-TBI violence in females, including psychiatric comorbidities and childhood abuse. It was concluded that the strength of evidence suggesting a relationship between TBI and violence in females is poor considering methodological limitations and scarcity of research. However, key findings herein indicate utility of further research to inform in- tervention and management.
Results: Only six of 153 identified papers met inclusion criteria. Three studies provided evidence of a positive re- lationship between violence and TBI in females specifically. The remaining found no significant gender differ- ences between levels of post-TBI violence, suggesting females exhibit similar levels of violence to males. The studies contribute knowledge of other factors that may influence post-TBI violence in females, including psychi- atric comorbidities and childhood abuse. It was concluded that the strength of evidence suggesting a relationship between TBI and violence in females is poor considering methodological limitations and scarcity of research. However, key findings herein indicate utility of further research to inform intervention and management.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-64
Number of pages11
JournalAggression and Violent Behavior
Volume25
Issue numberA
Early online date23 Jul 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2015
This open access research output is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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