Towards Transparency? Analysing the Sustainability Governance Practices of Ethical Certification. / Tregidga, Helen; Kearins, Kate; Collins, Eva .

In: Social and Environmental Accountability Journal, Vol. 39, No. 1, 21.01.2019, p. 44-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

E-pub ahead of print

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Towards Transparency? Analysing the Sustainability Governance Practices of Ethical Certification. / Tregidga, Helen; Kearins, Kate; Collins, Eva .

In: Social and Environmental Accountability Journal, Vol. 39, No. 1, 21.01.2019, p. 44-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Tregidga, H, Kearins, K & Collins, E 2019, 'Towards Transparency? Analysing the Sustainability Governance Practices of Ethical Certification', Social and Environmental Accountability Journal, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 44-69. https://doi.org/10.1080/0969160X.2019.1568276

APA

Tregidga, H., Kearins, K., & Collins, E. (2019). Towards Transparency? Analysing the Sustainability Governance Practices of Ethical Certification. Social and Environmental Accountability Journal, 39(1), 44-69. https://doi.org/10.1080/0969160X.2019.1568276

Vancouver

Author

Tregidga, Helen ; Kearins, Kate ; Collins, Eva . / Towards Transparency? Analysing the Sustainability Governance Practices of Ethical Certification. In: Social and Environmental Accountability Journal. 2019 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 44-69.

BibTeX

@article{213cced0d7eb4332ba905281a34e7b42,
title = "Towards Transparency? Analysing the Sustainability Governance Practices of Ethical Certification",
abstract = "Ethical certifications and their related labels are frequently seen as market solutions, but less often as sustainability governance regimes. Through an analytics of governmentality lens, we analyse two different ethical certification schemes operating within a single market. We question whether ethical certification and its related labelling can be relied upon to bring about {\textquoteleft}better{\textquoteright} transparency regarding the products offered from which various outcomes become possible – such as consumers making informed decisions, and various actors being able to hold companies to account. Consumer confusion, evident in our case study, calls into question ethical certification{\textquoteright}s achievement of a reduction in informational asymmetries. Our findings also show how this confusion provided an opportunity for a non-government organisation and a government oversight body to ultimately call a company to account. Overall, we point to both the limits and potential of ethical certification as a wider sustainability governance regime by highlighting complexities associated with acts of both governing and being governed.",
author = "Helen Tregidga and Kate Kearins and Eva Collins",
year = "2019",
month = jan,
day = "21",
doi = "10.1080/0969160X.2019.1568276",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "44--69",
journal = "Social and Environmental Accountability Journal",
issn = "0969-160X",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Towards Transparency? Analysing the Sustainability Governance Practices of Ethical Certification

AU - Tregidga, Helen

AU - Kearins, Kate

AU - Collins, Eva

PY - 2019/1/21

Y1 - 2019/1/21

N2 - Ethical certifications and their related labels are frequently seen as market solutions, but less often as sustainability governance regimes. Through an analytics of governmentality lens, we analyse two different ethical certification schemes operating within a single market. We question whether ethical certification and its related labelling can be relied upon to bring about ‘better’ transparency regarding the products offered from which various outcomes become possible – such as consumers making informed decisions, and various actors being able to hold companies to account. Consumer confusion, evident in our case study, calls into question ethical certification’s achievement of a reduction in informational asymmetries. Our findings also show how this confusion provided an opportunity for a non-government organisation and a government oversight body to ultimately call a company to account. Overall, we point to both the limits and potential of ethical certification as a wider sustainability governance regime by highlighting complexities associated with acts of both governing and being governed.

AB - Ethical certifications and their related labels are frequently seen as market solutions, but less often as sustainability governance regimes. Through an analytics of governmentality lens, we analyse two different ethical certification schemes operating within a single market. We question whether ethical certification and its related labelling can be relied upon to bring about ‘better’ transparency regarding the products offered from which various outcomes become possible – such as consumers making informed decisions, and various actors being able to hold companies to account. Consumer confusion, evident in our case study, calls into question ethical certification’s achievement of a reduction in informational asymmetries. Our findings also show how this confusion provided an opportunity for a non-government organisation and a government oversight body to ultimately call a company to account. Overall, we point to both the limits and potential of ethical certification as a wider sustainability governance regime by highlighting complexities associated with acts of both governing and being governed.

U2 - 10.1080/0969160X.2019.1568276

DO - 10.1080/0969160X.2019.1568276

M3 - Article

VL - 39

SP - 44

EP - 69

JO - Social and Environmental Accountability Journal

JF - Social and Environmental Accountability Journal

SN - 0969-160X

IS - 1

ER -