'To Make You See' : Screenwriting, description and the ‛lens-based’ tradition. / Ganz, Adam.

In: Journal of Screenwriting, Vol. 4, No. 1, 29.08.2012, p. 7-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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'To Make You See' : Screenwriting, description and the ‛lens-based’ tradition. / Ganz, Adam.

In: Journal of Screenwriting, Vol. 4, No. 1, 29.08.2012, p. 7-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Vancouver

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Ganz, Adam. / 'To Make You See' : Screenwriting, description and the ‛lens-based’ tradition. In: Journal of Screenwriting. 2012 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 7-24.

BibTeX

@article{5bc6ccc14fbd433faef65881cf8cd9d3,
title = "'To Make You See': Screenwriting, description and the ‛lens-based’ tradition",
abstract = "In this article I look at the descriptive writing in the screenplay, and link this to a tradition of ‘lens-based writing’, the precise visual description of phenomena observed through a lens for an audience unable to see what was described, which can be traced from the writing of Galileo and van Leeuwenhoek, through scientific and travel writing, to early fiction (with particular emphasis on Robinson Crusoe). I identify the most significant features of lens-based writing – the use of simple language and the separation of observation and deduction to communicate what has been seen through a simultaneous act of looking and framing, and show the similarities between this and screenwriting practice. I also make some observations about what this model can offer screenwriting research.",
keywords = "ens-based writing,observation,screenplay,prosthetics,telescope",
author = "Adam Ganz",
year = "2012",
month = "8",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1386/josc.4.1.7_1",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "7--24",
journal = "Journal of Screenwriting",
issn = "1759-7137",
publisher = "Intellect Publishers",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'To Make You See'

T2 - Screenwriting, description and the ‛lens-based’ tradition

AU - Ganz, Adam

PY - 2012/8/29

Y1 - 2012/8/29

N2 - In this article I look at the descriptive writing in the screenplay, and link this to a tradition of ‘lens-based writing’, the precise visual description of phenomena observed through a lens for an audience unable to see what was described, which can be traced from the writing of Galileo and van Leeuwenhoek, through scientific and travel writing, to early fiction (with particular emphasis on Robinson Crusoe). I identify the most significant features of lens-based writing – the use of simple language and the separation of observation and deduction to communicate what has been seen through a simultaneous act of looking and framing, and show the similarities between this and screenwriting practice. I also make some observations about what this model can offer screenwriting research.

AB - In this article I look at the descriptive writing in the screenplay, and link this to a tradition of ‘lens-based writing’, the precise visual description of phenomena observed through a lens for an audience unable to see what was described, which can be traced from the writing of Galileo and van Leeuwenhoek, through scientific and travel writing, to early fiction (with particular emphasis on Robinson Crusoe). I identify the most significant features of lens-based writing – the use of simple language and the separation of observation and deduction to communicate what has been seen through a simultaneous act of looking and framing, and show the similarities between this and screenwriting practice. I also make some observations about what this model can offer screenwriting research.

KW - ens-based writing,observation,screenplay,prosthetics,telescope

U2 - 10.1386/josc.4.1.7_1

DO - 10.1386/josc.4.1.7_1

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 7

EP - 24

JO - Journal of Screenwriting

JF - Journal of Screenwriting

SN - 1759-7137

IS - 1

ER -