To Be or Not to Be a Scientist? / Chevalier, Arnaud.

In: Research in Labor Economics, Vol. 45, 11.05.2017, p. 1-39.

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To Be or Not to Be a Scientist? / Chevalier, Arnaud.

In: Research in Labor Economics, Vol. 45, 11.05.2017, p. 1-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Chevalier, Arnaud. / To Be or Not to Be a Scientist?. In: Research in Labor Economics. 2017 ; Vol. 45. pp. 1-39.

BibTeX

@article{cbba87da26c143b29f8b2cce90c573e3,
title = "To Be or Not to Be a Scientist?",
abstract = "Employers regularly complain of a shortage of qualified scientists and advocate that to remain competitive more scientists need to be trained. However, using a survey of graduates from British universities, I report that 3 years after graduation less than 50{\%} of graduates from science subjects are working in a scientific occupation.Accounting for selection into major and occupation type, I estimate the wages of graduates and report that the wage premium of science graduates only occurs when these graduates are matched to a scientific occupation – and not because science skills are in demand in all occupations. I also provide additional evidence to assess whether science graduates are pushed or pulled into non-scientific occupations. Altogether, the evidence does not support the claim that science graduates are pulled by better conditions, financial or otherwise, into non-scientific jobs.",
author = "Arnaud Chevalier",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1108/S0147-912120170000045001",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "1--39",
journal = "Research in Labor Economics",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - To Be or Not to Be a Scientist?

AU - Chevalier, Arnaud

PY - 2017/5/11

Y1 - 2017/5/11

N2 - Employers regularly complain of a shortage of qualified scientists and advocate that to remain competitive more scientists need to be trained. However, using a survey of graduates from British universities, I report that 3 years after graduation less than 50% of graduates from science subjects are working in a scientific occupation.Accounting for selection into major and occupation type, I estimate the wages of graduates and report that the wage premium of science graduates only occurs when these graduates are matched to a scientific occupation – and not because science skills are in demand in all occupations. I also provide additional evidence to assess whether science graduates are pushed or pulled into non-scientific occupations. Altogether, the evidence does not support the claim that science graduates are pulled by better conditions, financial or otherwise, into non-scientific jobs.

AB - Employers regularly complain of a shortage of qualified scientists and advocate that to remain competitive more scientists need to be trained. However, using a survey of graduates from British universities, I report that 3 years after graduation less than 50% of graduates from science subjects are working in a scientific occupation.Accounting for selection into major and occupation type, I estimate the wages of graduates and report that the wage premium of science graduates only occurs when these graduates are matched to a scientific occupation – and not because science skills are in demand in all occupations. I also provide additional evidence to assess whether science graduates are pushed or pulled into non-scientific occupations. Altogether, the evidence does not support the claim that science graduates are pulled by better conditions, financial or otherwise, into non-scientific jobs.

U2 - 10.1108/S0147-912120170000045001

DO - 10.1108/S0147-912120170000045001

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 1

EP - 39

JO - Research in Labor Economics

JF - Research in Labor Economics

ER -