“This Title is no Longer Available”: Preserving Television in the Streaming Age. / Kelly, JP.

In: Television & New Media, 09.06.2020, p. 1-19.

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“This Title is no Longer Available”: Preserving Television in the Streaming Age. / Kelly, JP.

In: Television & New Media, 09.06.2020, p. 1-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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@article{449dda7d3b28421c8bac362fdf0077d9,
title = "“This Title is no Longer Available”: Preserving Television in the Streaming Age",
abstract = "This article examines several recent changes in the technological composition and market logics of television. It considers what these developments might mean for the medium{\textquoteright}s preservational qualities and for our understanding of television history more broadly. By focusing on the growth of streaming, the increasing “datafication” of the TV industry, and the prominence of interfaces and catalogues, I demonstrate that the ephemerality of television is both intensifying and diversifying, creating a number of methodological challenges in the process. These developments are placed in a longer history of critical debates around the preservation of digital media and the prospect of a digital dark age (Kuny 1997) so that we might learn lessons from the past that can be applied to the preservational challenges of the present. The article concludes by proposing a number of practical steps so that future television historians might be better equipped to avoid a “scholarly dark age”.Keywords: digital dark ages; subscription video-on-demand; interfaces; catalogues; subscription economy; preservation.",
keywords = "digital dark ages, subscription video-on-demand, INTERFACES, catalogues, subscription economy, preservation, media history, television",
author = "JP Kelly",
year = "2020",
month = jun,
day = "9",
doi = "10.1177/1527476420928480",
language = "English",
pages = "1--19",
journal = "Television & New Media",
issn = "1527-4764",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - “This Title is no Longer Available”: Preserving Television in the Streaming Age

AU - Kelly, JP

PY - 2020/6/9

Y1 - 2020/6/9

N2 - This article examines several recent changes in the technological composition and market logics of television. It considers what these developments might mean for the medium’s preservational qualities and for our understanding of television history more broadly. By focusing on the growth of streaming, the increasing “datafication” of the TV industry, and the prominence of interfaces and catalogues, I demonstrate that the ephemerality of television is both intensifying and diversifying, creating a number of methodological challenges in the process. These developments are placed in a longer history of critical debates around the preservation of digital media and the prospect of a digital dark age (Kuny 1997) so that we might learn lessons from the past that can be applied to the preservational challenges of the present. The article concludes by proposing a number of practical steps so that future television historians might be better equipped to avoid a “scholarly dark age”.Keywords: digital dark ages; subscription video-on-demand; interfaces; catalogues; subscription economy; preservation.

AB - This article examines several recent changes in the technological composition and market logics of television. It considers what these developments might mean for the medium’s preservational qualities and for our understanding of television history more broadly. By focusing on the growth of streaming, the increasing “datafication” of the TV industry, and the prominence of interfaces and catalogues, I demonstrate that the ephemerality of television is both intensifying and diversifying, creating a number of methodological challenges in the process. These developments are placed in a longer history of critical debates around the preservation of digital media and the prospect of a digital dark age (Kuny 1997) so that we might learn lessons from the past that can be applied to the preservational challenges of the present. The article concludes by proposing a number of practical steps so that future television historians might be better equipped to avoid a “scholarly dark age”.Keywords: digital dark ages; subscription video-on-demand; interfaces; catalogues; subscription economy; preservation.

KW - digital dark ages

KW - subscription video-on-demand

KW - INTERFACES

KW - catalogues

KW - subscription economy

KW - preservation

KW - media history

KW - television

U2 - 10.1177/1527476420928480

DO - 10.1177/1527476420928480

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 19

JO - Television & New Media

JF - Television & New Media

SN - 1527-4764

ER -