The Three Ages of Aerial Vision : London's Aerial Iconography from Wenceslaus Hollar to Google Earth. / Gilbert, David.

In: London Journal, Vol. 35, No. 3, 01.11.2010, p. 289-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Published

Standard

The Three Ages of Aerial Vision : London's Aerial Iconography from Wenceslaus Hollar to Google Earth. / Gilbert, David.

In: London Journal, Vol. 35, No. 3, 01.11.2010, p. 289-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

BibTeX

@article{78b53ea008cb44c08eb8f9f8ce1bba90,
title = "The Three Ages of Aerial Vision: London's Aerial Iconography from Wenceslaus Hollar to Google Earth",
abstract = "This final contribution the special issue of the London Journal on aerial photography also considers other contributions to the original colloquium at the University of Westminster in 2008. It argues that there has been a significant democratization of the view from above in recent years, associated with new high buildings, air travel and digital technologies. It suggests that we may be at the beginning of a distinctive third {\textquoteleft}age of aerial vision{\textquoteright} of London, following earlier periods where the view was dominated first by the creative imagination, and then by the technology of photography. Developments such as immersive computing and 3-D cinema indicate that London{\textquoteright}s {\textquoteleft}aerial iconography{\textquoteright} may be particularly suited to a period where the aerial view is kinetic and interactive. London{\textquoteright}s incoherence and visual complexity, for so long seen as problematic by those seeking to grasp the city from above, creates an excellent opportunity for play and exploration.",
keywords = "London, Aerial Photography, Iconography, Google Earth, Urban History, Visuality",
author = "David Gilbert",
year = "2010",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1179/174963210X12814015170278",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "289--299",
journal = "London Journal",
issn = "0305-8034",
publisher = "Maney Publishing",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Three Ages of Aerial Vision

T2 - London's Aerial Iconography from Wenceslaus Hollar to Google Earth

AU - Gilbert, David

PY - 2010/11/1

Y1 - 2010/11/1

N2 - This final contribution the special issue of the London Journal on aerial photography also considers other contributions to the original colloquium at the University of Westminster in 2008. It argues that there has been a significant democratization of the view from above in recent years, associated with new high buildings, air travel and digital technologies. It suggests that we may be at the beginning of a distinctive third ‘age of aerial vision’ of London, following earlier periods where the view was dominated first by the creative imagination, and then by the technology of photography. Developments such as immersive computing and 3-D cinema indicate that London’s ‘aerial iconography’ may be particularly suited to a period where the aerial view is kinetic and interactive. London’s incoherence and visual complexity, for so long seen as problematic by those seeking to grasp the city from above, creates an excellent opportunity for play and exploration.

AB - This final contribution the special issue of the London Journal on aerial photography also considers other contributions to the original colloquium at the University of Westminster in 2008. It argues that there has been a significant democratization of the view from above in recent years, associated with new high buildings, air travel and digital technologies. It suggests that we may be at the beginning of a distinctive third ‘age of aerial vision’ of London, following earlier periods where the view was dominated first by the creative imagination, and then by the technology of photography. Developments such as immersive computing and 3-D cinema indicate that London’s ‘aerial iconography’ may be particularly suited to a period where the aerial view is kinetic and interactive. London’s incoherence and visual complexity, for so long seen as problematic by those seeking to grasp the city from above, creates an excellent opportunity for play and exploration.

KW - London

KW - Aerial Photography

KW - Iconography

KW - Google Earth

KW - Urban History

KW - Visuality

U2 - 10.1179/174963210X12814015170278

DO - 10.1179/174963210X12814015170278

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 289

EP - 299

JO - London Journal

JF - London Journal

SN - 0305-8034

IS - 3

ER -