The role of cryptotephra in refining the chronology of Late Pleistocene human evolution and cultural change in North Africa. / Barton; Lane; Albert, ; White, Dustin; Collcutt; Bouzouggar; Ditchfield; Farr; Oh; Ottolini; Smith; Van Peer; Kindermann.

In: Quaternary Science Reviews, Vol. 118, 15.06.2015, p. 151-169.

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The role of cryptotephra in refining the chronology of Late Pleistocene human evolution and cultural change in North Africa. / Barton; Lane; Albert, ; White, Dustin; Collcutt; Bouzouggar; Ditchfield; Farr; Oh; Ottolini; Smith; Van Peer; Kindermann.

In: Quaternary Science Reviews, Vol. 118, 15.06.2015, p. 151-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Barton, Lane, Albert, , White, D, Collcutt, Bouzouggar, Ditchfield, Farr, Oh, Ottolini, Smith, Van Peer & Kindermann 2015, 'The role of cryptotephra in refining the chronology of Late Pleistocene human evolution and cultural change in North Africa', Quaternary Science Reviews, vol. 118, pp. 151-169. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2014.09.008

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Barton ; Lane ; Albert, ; White, Dustin ; Collcutt ; Bouzouggar ; Ditchfield ; Farr ; Oh ; Ottolini ; Smith ; Van Peer ; Kindermann. / The role of cryptotephra in refining the chronology of Late Pleistocene human evolution and cultural change in North Africa. In: Quaternary Science Reviews. 2015 ; Vol. 118. pp. 151-169.

BibTeX

@article{b74e2c64db9641f398d6e1d466330458,
title = "The role of cryptotephra in refining the chronology of Late Pleistocene human evolution and cultural change in North Africa",
abstract = "Sites in North Africa hold key information for dating the presence of Homo sapiens and the distribution of Middle Stone Age (MSA), Middle Palaeolithic (MP) and Later Stone Age (LSA) cultural activity in the Late Pleistocene. Here we present new and review recently published tephrochronological evidence for five cave sites in North Africa with long MSA/MP and LSA cultural sequences. Four tephra horizons have been identified at the Haua Fteah (Cyrenaica, Libya). They include cryptotephra evidence for the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) eruption dating to ∼39 ka that allows correlation with other Palaeolithic sequences in the eastern Mediterranean and as far north as Russia. Cryptotephra have also been recorded from the Moroccan sites of Taforalt, Rhafas and Dar es-Soltane 1. At Taforalt the geochemical composition suggests a provenance in the Azores, while examples from Sodmein (Egypt) appear to derive from central Anatolia and another unknown source. In these latter examples chemical compositional data from relevant proximal volcanic centres is currently lacking so the identification of tephra in layers of known age and cultural association provides the first reliable age determinations for distal volcanic events and their geographical extent. The future potential for tephrochronological research in North Africa is also discussed.",
author = "Barton and Lane and Albert and Dustin White and Collcutt and Bouzouggar and Ditchfield and Farr and Oh and Ottolini and Smith and {Van Peer} and Kindermann",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.quascirev.2014.09.008",
language = "English",
volume = "118",
pages = "151--169",
journal = "Quaternary Science Reviews",
issn = "0277-3791",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of cryptotephra in refining the chronology of Late Pleistocene human evolution and cultural change in North Africa

AU - Barton,

AU - Lane,

AU - Albert,

AU - White, Dustin

AU - Collcutt,

AU - Bouzouggar,

AU - Ditchfield,

AU - Farr,

AU - Oh,

AU - Ottolini,

AU - Smith,

AU - Van Peer,

AU - Kindermann,

PY - 2015/6/15

Y1 - 2015/6/15

N2 - Sites in North Africa hold key information for dating the presence of Homo sapiens and the distribution of Middle Stone Age (MSA), Middle Palaeolithic (MP) and Later Stone Age (LSA) cultural activity in the Late Pleistocene. Here we present new and review recently published tephrochronological evidence for five cave sites in North Africa with long MSA/MP and LSA cultural sequences. Four tephra horizons have been identified at the Haua Fteah (Cyrenaica, Libya). They include cryptotephra evidence for the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) eruption dating to ∼39 ka that allows correlation with other Palaeolithic sequences in the eastern Mediterranean and as far north as Russia. Cryptotephra have also been recorded from the Moroccan sites of Taforalt, Rhafas and Dar es-Soltane 1. At Taforalt the geochemical composition suggests a provenance in the Azores, while examples from Sodmein (Egypt) appear to derive from central Anatolia and another unknown source. In these latter examples chemical compositional data from relevant proximal volcanic centres is currently lacking so the identification of tephra in layers of known age and cultural association provides the first reliable age determinations for distal volcanic events and their geographical extent. The future potential for tephrochronological research in North Africa is also discussed.

AB - Sites in North Africa hold key information for dating the presence of Homo sapiens and the distribution of Middle Stone Age (MSA), Middle Palaeolithic (MP) and Later Stone Age (LSA) cultural activity in the Late Pleistocene. Here we present new and review recently published tephrochronological evidence for five cave sites in North Africa with long MSA/MP and LSA cultural sequences. Four tephra horizons have been identified at the Haua Fteah (Cyrenaica, Libya). They include cryptotephra evidence for the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) eruption dating to ∼39 ka that allows correlation with other Palaeolithic sequences in the eastern Mediterranean and as far north as Russia. Cryptotephra have also been recorded from the Moroccan sites of Taforalt, Rhafas and Dar es-Soltane 1. At Taforalt the geochemical composition suggests a provenance in the Azores, while examples from Sodmein (Egypt) appear to derive from central Anatolia and another unknown source. In these latter examples chemical compositional data from relevant proximal volcanic centres is currently lacking so the identification of tephra in layers of known age and cultural association provides the first reliable age determinations for distal volcanic events and their geographical extent. The future potential for tephrochronological research in North Africa is also discussed.

U2 - 10.1016/j.quascirev.2014.09.008

DO - 10.1016/j.quascirev.2014.09.008

M3 - Article

VL - 118

SP - 151

EP - 169

JO - Quaternary Science Reviews

JF - Quaternary Science Reviews

SN - 0277-3791

ER -