The privacy paradox in the context of online social networking : A self‐identity perspective. / Wu, Philip.

In: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, Vol. 70, No. 3, 03.2019, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Published

Standard

The privacy paradox in the context of online social networking : A self‐identity perspective. / Wu, Philip.

In: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, Vol. 70, No. 3, 03.2019, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Wu, P 2019, 'The privacy paradox in the context of online social networking: A self‐identity perspective', Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, vol. 70, no. 3, pp. 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.24113

APA

Wu, P. (2019). The privacy paradox in the context of online social networking: A self‐identity perspective. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 70(3), 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.24113

Vancouver

Wu P. The privacy paradox in the context of online social networking: A self‐identity perspective. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology. 2019 Mar;70(3):1-11. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.24113

Author

Wu, Philip. / The privacy paradox in the context of online social networking : A self‐identity perspective. In: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology. 2019 ; Vol. 70, No. 3. pp. 1-11.

BibTeX

@article{1716d53e552943a19457d84dd3df8515,
title = "The privacy paradox in the context of online social networking: A self‐identity perspective",
abstract = "Drawing on identity theory and privacy research, this paper argues that the need for self-identity is a key factor affecting people{\textquoteright}s privacy behavior in social networking sites. I first unpack the mainstream, autonomy-centric discourse of privacy, and then present a research model that illustrates a possible new theorization of the relationship between self-identity and information privacy. An empirical study with Facebook users confirms the main hypotheses. In particular, the data show that the need for self-identity is positively related to privacy management behaviors, which in turn result in increased self-disclosure in online social networks. I subsequently argue that the so-called “privacy paradox” is not a paradox per se in the context of online social networking; rather, privacy concerns reflect the ideology of an autonomous self, whereas social construction of self-identity explains voluntary self-disclosure. ",
keywords = "Information privacy, Privacy paradox, Self-identity, Social networking sites",
author = "Philip Wu",
year = "2019",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1002/asi.24113",
language = "English",
volume = "70",
pages = "1--11",
journal = "Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology",
issn = "2330-1643",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The privacy paradox in the context of online social networking

T2 - A self‐identity perspective

AU - Wu, Philip

PY - 2019/3

Y1 - 2019/3

N2 - Drawing on identity theory and privacy research, this paper argues that the need for self-identity is a key factor affecting people’s privacy behavior in social networking sites. I first unpack the mainstream, autonomy-centric discourse of privacy, and then present a research model that illustrates a possible new theorization of the relationship between self-identity and information privacy. An empirical study with Facebook users confirms the main hypotheses. In particular, the data show that the need for self-identity is positively related to privacy management behaviors, which in turn result in increased self-disclosure in online social networks. I subsequently argue that the so-called “privacy paradox” is not a paradox per se in the context of online social networking; rather, privacy concerns reflect the ideology of an autonomous self, whereas social construction of self-identity explains voluntary self-disclosure.

AB - Drawing on identity theory and privacy research, this paper argues that the need for self-identity is a key factor affecting people’s privacy behavior in social networking sites. I first unpack the mainstream, autonomy-centric discourse of privacy, and then present a research model that illustrates a possible new theorization of the relationship between self-identity and information privacy. An empirical study with Facebook users confirms the main hypotheses. In particular, the data show that the need for self-identity is positively related to privacy management behaviors, which in turn result in increased self-disclosure in online social networks. I subsequently argue that the so-called “privacy paradox” is not a paradox per se in the context of online social networking; rather, privacy concerns reflect the ideology of an autonomous self, whereas social construction of self-identity explains voluntary self-disclosure.

KW - Information privacy

KW - Privacy paradox

KW - Self-identity

KW - Social networking sites

U2 - 10.1002/asi.24113

DO - 10.1002/asi.24113

M3 - Article

VL - 70

SP - 1

EP - 11

JO - Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology

JF - Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology

SN - 2330-1643

IS - 3

ER -