The Port in the Urban System of Sicilian Naxos (5th c. BC). / Lentini, Maria Costanza; Blackman, David ; Pakkanen, Jari.

Ancient Ports. The Geography of Connections: Proceedings of an International Conference at the Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, 23–25 September 2010. ed. / K. Höghammar; Brita Alroth; A. Lindhagen. Uppsala, 2016. p. 253–267 (Boreas. Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations; Vol. 34).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Published

Standard

The Port in the Urban System of Sicilian Naxos (5th c. BC). / Lentini, Maria Costanza; Blackman, David ; Pakkanen, Jari.

Ancient Ports. The Geography of Connections: Proceedings of an International Conference at the Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, 23–25 September 2010. ed. / K. Höghammar; Brita Alroth; A. Lindhagen. Uppsala, 2016. p. 253–267 (Boreas. Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations; Vol. 34).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Harvard

Lentini, MC, Blackman, D & Pakkanen, J 2016, The Port in the Urban System of Sicilian Naxos (5th c. BC). in K Höghammar, B Alroth & A Lindhagen (eds), Ancient Ports. The Geography of Connections: Proceedings of an International Conference at the Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, 23–25 September 2010. Boreas. Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations, vol. 34, Uppsala, pp. 253–267.

APA

Lentini, M. C., Blackman, D., & Pakkanen, J. (2016). The Port in the Urban System of Sicilian Naxos (5th c. BC). In K. Höghammar, B. Alroth, & A. Lindhagen (Eds.), Ancient Ports. The Geography of Connections: Proceedings of an International Conference at the Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, 23–25 September 2010 (pp. 253–267). (Boreas. Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations; Vol. 34). Uppsala.

Vancouver

Lentini MC, Blackman D, Pakkanen J. The Port in the Urban System of Sicilian Naxos (5th c. BC). In Höghammar K, Alroth B, Lindhagen A, editors, Ancient Ports. The Geography of Connections: Proceedings of an International Conference at the Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, 23–25 September 2010. Uppsala. 2016. p. 253–267. (Boreas. Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations).

Author

Lentini, Maria Costanza ; Blackman, David ; Pakkanen, Jari. / The Port in the Urban System of Sicilian Naxos (5th c. BC). Ancient Ports. The Geography of Connections: Proceedings of an International Conference at the Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, 23–25 September 2010. editor / K. Höghammar ; Brita Alroth ; A. Lindhagen. Uppsala, 2016. pp. 253–267 (Boreas. Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations).

BibTeX

@inproceedings{49e05dba75e04d0093c3be0a0fc5d659,
title = "The Port in the Urban System of Sicilian Naxos (5th c. BC)",
abstract = "The precise location of the port of Naxos, the first Greek colony in Sicily (734 BC), was long unknown due to the significant change in the ancient coastline. The recent discovery of the city’s Classical shipsheds (neoria) is crucial in this regard: the port basin was located in the south-west sector of the bay and an outline of the spatial and functional relationships between the harbour and the city plan is now feasible. It is also possible to reconstruct the basic features of the city’s ancient landscape, where the bay must have played a central role—and perhaps this reconstruction will also assist us in locating the site of the altar of Apollo Archegetes. Further research will include locating the commercial harbour and studying its relationship with the city and the agora.The neoria block (most likely c. 28 m x 55 m) lies in the northern part of the city, on the lower slopes of the Larunchi Hill, and its orientation is slightly different from the 5th-century orthogonal urban grid. The excavations have shown that the shipsheds were inside the city walls and, furthermore, were very close to the agora which occupied the upper terrace, dominating the bay and the port. Such proximity could be an indicator of the relative importance of the military fleet for ancient Naxos. For those coming from the sea Naxos displayed the shipsheds as an indication of its wealth and power, following the example known from other Greek poleis.",
author = "Lentini, {Maria Costanza} and David Blackman and Jari Pakkanen",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-91-554-9609-8",
series = "Boreas. Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations",
publisher = "Uppsala Universitet",
pages = "253–267",
editor = "K. H{\"o}ghammar and Brita Alroth and A. Lindhagen",
booktitle = "Ancient Ports. The Geography of Connections",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - The Port in the Urban System of Sicilian Naxos (5th c. BC)

AU - Lentini, Maria Costanza

AU - Blackman, David

AU - Pakkanen, Jari

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - The precise location of the port of Naxos, the first Greek colony in Sicily (734 BC), was long unknown due to the significant change in the ancient coastline. The recent discovery of the city’s Classical shipsheds (neoria) is crucial in this regard: the port basin was located in the south-west sector of the bay and an outline of the spatial and functional relationships between the harbour and the city plan is now feasible. It is also possible to reconstruct the basic features of the city’s ancient landscape, where the bay must have played a central role—and perhaps this reconstruction will also assist us in locating the site of the altar of Apollo Archegetes. Further research will include locating the commercial harbour and studying its relationship with the city and the agora.The neoria block (most likely c. 28 m x 55 m) lies in the northern part of the city, on the lower slopes of the Larunchi Hill, and its orientation is slightly different from the 5th-century orthogonal urban grid. The excavations have shown that the shipsheds were inside the city walls and, furthermore, were very close to the agora which occupied the upper terrace, dominating the bay and the port. Such proximity could be an indicator of the relative importance of the military fleet for ancient Naxos. For those coming from the sea Naxos displayed the shipsheds as an indication of its wealth and power, following the example known from other Greek poleis.

AB - The precise location of the port of Naxos, the first Greek colony in Sicily (734 BC), was long unknown due to the significant change in the ancient coastline. The recent discovery of the city’s Classical shipsheds (neoria) is crucial in this regard: the port basin was located in the south-west sector of the bay and an outline of the spatial and functional relationships between the harbour and the city plan is now feasible. It is also possible to reconstruct the basic features of the city’s ancient landscape, where the bay must have played a central role—and perhaps this reconstruction will also assist us in locating the site of the altar of Apollo Archegetes. Further research will include locating the commercial harbour and studying its relationship with the city and the agora.The neoria block (most likely c. 28 m x 55 m) lies in the northern part of the city, on the lower slopes of the Larunchi Hill, and its orientation is slightly different from the 5th-century orthogonal urban grid. The excavations have shown that the shipsheds were inside the city walls and, furthermore, were very close to the agora which occupied the upper terrace, dominating the bay and the port. Such proximity could be an indicator of the relative importance of the military fleet for ancient Naxos. For those coming from the sea Naxos displayed the shipsheds as an indication of its wealth and power, following the example known from other Greek poleis.

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 978-91-554-9609-8

T3 - Boreas. Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations

SP - 253

EP - 267

BT - Ancient Ports. The Geography of Connections

A2 - Höghammar, K.

A2 - Alroth, Brita

A2 - Lindhagen, A.

CY - Uppsala

ER -