The impact of autism spectrum disorder and alexithymia on judgments of moral acceptability. / Brewer, Rebecca; Marsh, Abigail; Catmur, Caroline; Cardinale, Elise; Stoycos, Sarah; Cook, Richard; Bird, Geoffrey.

In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Vol. 124, No. 3, 08.2015, p. 589-595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Published

Standard

The impact of autism spectrum disorder and alexithymia on judgments of moral acceptability. / Brewer, Rebecca; Marsh, Abigail; Catmur, Caroline; Cardinale, Elise; Stoycos, Sarah; Cook, Richard; Bird, Geoffrey.

In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Vol. 124, No. 3, 08.2015, p. 589-595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Brewer, R, Marsh, A, Catmur, C, Cardinale, E, Stoycos, S, Cook, R & Bird, G 2015, 'The impact of autism spectrum disorder and alexithymia on judgments of moral acceptability', Journal of Abnormal Psychology, vol. 124, no. 3, pp. 589-595. https://doi.org/10.1037/abn0000076

APA

Brewer, R., Marsh, A., Catmur, C., Cardinale, E., Stoycos, S., Cook, R., & Bird, G. (2015). The impact of autism spectrum disorder and alexithymia on judgments of moral acceptability. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 124(3), 589-595. https://doi.org/10.1037/abn0000076

Vancouver

Brewer R, Marsh A, Catmur C, Cardinale E, Stoycos S, Cook R et al. The impact of autism spectrum disorder and alexithymia on judgments of moral acceptability. Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 2015 Aug;124(3):589-595. https://doi.org/10.1037/abn0000076

Author

Brewer, Rebecca ; Marsh, Abigail ; Catmur, Caroline ; Cardinale, Elise ; Stoycos, Sarah ; Cook, Richard ; Bird, Geoffrey. / The impact of autism spectrum disorder and alexithymia on judgments of moral acceptability. In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 2015 ; Vol. 124, No. 3. pp. 589-595.

BibTeX

@article{e2cf22b40efd4bbc9c3a11d751eb5a51,
title = "The impact of autism spectrum disorder and alexithymia on judgments of moral acceptability",
abstract = "One{\textquoteright}s own emotional response toward a hypothetical action can influence judgments of its moral acceptability. Some individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit atypical emotional processing, and moral judgments. Research suggests, however, that emotional deficits in ASD are due to co-occurring alexithymia, meaning atypical moral judgments in ASD may be due to alexithymia also. Individuals with and without ASD (matched for alexithymia) judged the moral acceptability of emotion-evoking statements and identified the emotion evoked. Moral acceptability judgments were predicted by alexithymia. Crucially, however, this relationship held only for individuals without ASD. While ASD diagnostic status did not directly predict either judgment, those with ASD did not base their moral acceptability judgments on emotional information. Findings are consistent with evidence demonstrating that decision-making is less subject to emotional biases in those with ASD. ",
author = "Rebecca Brewer and Abigail Marsh and Caroline Catmur and Elise Cardinale and Sarah Stoycos and Richard Cook and Geoffrey Bird",
year = "2015",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1037/abn0000076",
language = "English",
volume = "124",
pages = "589--595",
journal = "Journal of Abnormal Psychology",
issn = "0021-843X",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of autism spectrum disorder and alexithymia on judgments of moral acceptability

AU - Brewer, Rebecca

AU - Marsh, Abigail

AU - Catmur, Caroline

AU - Cardinale, Elise

AU - Stoycos, Sarah

AU - Cook, Richard

AU - Bird, Geoffrey

PY - 2015/8

Y1 - 2015/8

N2 - One’s own emotional response toward a hypothetical action can influence judgments of its moral acceptability. Some individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit atypical emotional processing, and moral judgments. Research suggests, however, that emotional deficits in ASD are due to co-occurring alexithymia, meaning atypical moral judgments in ASD may be due to alexithymia also. Individuals with and without ASD (matched for alexithymia) judged the moral acceptability of emotion-evoking statements and identified the emotion evoked. Moral acceptability judgments were predicted by alexithymia. Crucially, however, this relationship held only for individuals without ASD. While ASD diagnostic status did not directly predict either judgment, those with ASD did not base their moral acceptability judgments on emotional information. Findings are consistent with evidence demonstrating that decision-making is less subject to emotional biases in those with ASD.

AB - One’s own emotional response toward a hypothetical action can influence judgments of its moral acceptability. Some individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit atypical emotional processing, and moral judgments. Research suggests, however, that emotional deficits in ASD are due to co-occurring alexithymia, meaning atypical moral judgments in ASD may be due to alexithymia also. Individuals with and without ASD (matched for alexithymia) judged the moral acceptability of emotion-evoking statements and identified the emotion evoked. Moral acceptability judgments were predicted by alexithymia. Crucially, however, this relationship held only for individuals without ASD. While ASD diagnostic status did not directly predict either judgment, those with ASD did not base their moral acceptability judgments on emotional information. Findings are consistent with evidence demonstrating that decision-making is less subject to emotional biases in those with ASD.

U2 - 10.1037/abn0000076

DO - 10.1037/abn0000076

M3 - Article

VL - 124

SP - 589

EP - 595

JO - Journal of Abnormal Psychology

JF - Journal of Abnormal Psychology

SN - 0021-843X

IS - 3

ER -