The effect of contrast on perceived speed and flicker. / Hammett, Stephen T.; Larsson, Jonas.

In: Journal of Vision, Vol. 12, No. 12, 17, 11.2012.

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The effect of contrast on perceived speed and flicker. / Hammett, Stephen T.; Larsson, Jonas.

In: Journal of Vision, Vol. 12, No. 12, 17, 11.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{78e2aba16fe44c0f9bb42c2aa713f596,
title = "The effect of contrast on perceived speed and flicker",
abstract = "Slowly moving low contrast patterns appear to drift more slowly than higher contrast patterns. It has been reported that this effect of contrast is reversed for flickering patterns such that they appear to flicker faster than high contrast patterns. This apparent difference in the effect of contrast on perceived speed and flicker may place important constraints upon models of speed encoding in the human visual system. We have measured perceived speed and flicker over a range of spatial and temporal frequencies. The results indicate that contrast has qualitatively (but not quantitatively) similar effects upon perceived speed and flicker. The results also indicate that the effect of contrast upon perceived speed is likely to be inherited from the effect of contrast upon perceived flicker. These findings allow a relaxation of previous constraints upon models of speed encoding.",
author = "Hammett, {Stephen T.} and Jonas Larsson",
year = "2012",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1167/12.12.17",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "Journal of Vision",
issn = "1534-7362",
publisher = "Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Inc.",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of contrast on perceived speed and flicker

AU - Hammett, Stephen T.

AU - Larsson, Jonas

PY - 2012/11

Y1 - 2012/11

N2 - Slowly moving low contrast patterns appear to drift more slowly than higher contrast patterns. It has been reported that this effect of contrast is reversed for flickering patterns such that they appear to flicker faster than high contrast patterns. This apparent difference in the effect of contrast on perceived speed and flicker may place important constraints upon models of speed encoding in the human visual system. We have measured perceived speed and flicker over a range of spatial and temporal frequencies. The results indicate that contrast has qualitatively (but not quantitatively) similar effects upon perceived speed and flicker. The results also indicate that the effect of contrast upon perceived speed is likely to be inherited from the effect of contrast upon perceived flicker. These findings allow a relaxation of previous constraints upon models of speed encoding.

AB - Slowly moving low contrast patterns appear to drift more slowly than higher contrast patterns. It has been reported that this effect of contrast is reversed for flickering patterns such that they appear to flicker faster than high contrast patterns. This apparent difference in the effect of contrast on perceived speed and flicker may place important constraints upon models of speed encoding in the human visual system. We have measured perceived speed and flicker over a range of spatial and temporal frequencies. The results indicate that contrast has qualitatively (but not quantitatively) similar effects upon perceived speed and flicker. The results also indicate that the effect of contrast upon perceived speed is likely to be inherited from the effect of contrast upon perceived flicker. These findings allow a relaxation of previous constraints upon models of speed encoding.

U2 - 10.1167/12.12.17

DO - 10.1167/12.12.17

M3 - Article

VL - 12

JO - Journal of Vision

JF - Journal of Vision

SN - 1534-7362

IS - 12

M1 - 17

ER -