Social Media Analysis and Public Opinion : The 2010 UK General Election. / Anstead, Nick; O'Loughlin, Ben.

In: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.03.2015, p. 204–220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Published

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Social Media Analysis and Public Opinion : The 2010 UK General Election. / Anstead, Nick; O'Loughlin, Ben.

In: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.03.2015, p. 204–220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Anstead, N & O'Loughlin, B 2015, 'Social Media Analysis and Public Opinion: The 2010 UK General Election', Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 204–220. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcc4.12102

APA

Anstead, N., & O'Loughlin, B. (2015). Social Media Analysis and Public Opinion: The 2010 UK General Election. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 20(2), 204–220. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcc4.12102

Vancouver

Anstead N, O'Loughlin B. Social Media Analysis and Public Opinion: The 2010 UK General Election. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. 2015 Mar 1;20(2):204–220. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcc4.12102

Author

Anstead, Nick ; O'Loughlin, Ben. / Social Media Analysis and Public Opinion : The 2010 UK General Election. In: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. 2015 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 204–220.

BibTeX

@article{6e4ac8a0241b4e03af5a9db314c243c0,
title = "Social Media Analysis and Public Opinion: The 2010 UK General Election",
abstract = "Social media monitoring in politics can be understood by situating it in theories of public opinion. The multimethod study we present here indicates how social media monitoring allow for analysis of social dynamics through which opinions form and shift. Analysis of media coverage from the 2010 UK General Election demonstrates that social media are now being equated with public opinion by political journalists. We use interviews with pollsters, social media researchers and journalists to examine the perceived link between social media and public opinion. In light of competing understandings these interviews reveal, we argue for a broadening of the definition of public opinion to include its social dimension.",
keywords = "Elections, Grounded Theory, Public Opinion, Social Media, Twitter, United Kingdom",
author = "Nick Anstead and Ben O'Loughlin",
note = "Nick Anstead, Department of Media and Communications, London School of Economics and Political Science, London Ben O'Loughlin, Department of Politics and International Relations, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey",
year = "2015",
month = mar,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jcc4.12102",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "204–220",
journal = "Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication",
issn = "1083-6101",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social Media Analysis and Public Opinion

T2 - The 2010 UK General Election

AU - Anstead, Nick

AU - O'Loughlin, Ben

N1 - Nick Anstead, Department of Media and Communications, London School of Economics and Political Science, London Ben O'Loughlin, Department of Politics and International Relations, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey

PY - 2015/3/1

Y1 - 2015/3/1

N2 - Social media monitoring in politics can be understood by situating it in theories of public opinion. The multimethod study we present here indicates how social media monitoring allow for analysis of social dynamics through which opinions form and shift. Analysis of media coverage from the 2010 UK General Election demonstrates that social media are now being equated with public opinion by political journalists. We use interviews with pollsters, social media researchers and journalists to examine the perceived link between social media and public opinion. In light of competing understandings these interviews reveal, we argue for a broadening of the definition of public opinion to include its social dimension.

AB - Social media monitoring in politics can be understood by situating it in theories of public opinion. The multimethod study we present here indicates how social media monitoring allow for analysis of social dynamics through which opinions form and shift. Analysis of media coverage from the 2010 UK General Election demonstrates that social media are now being equated with public opinion by political journalists. We use interviews with pollsters, social media researchers and journalists to examine the perceived link between social media and public opinion. In light of competing understandings these interviews reveal, we argue for a broadening of the definition of public opinion to include its social dimension.

KW - Elections

KW - Grounded Theory

KW - Public Opinion

KW - Social Media

KW - Twitter

KW - United Kingdom

U2 - 10.1111/jcc4.12102

DO - 10.1111/jcc4.12102

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 204

EP - 220

JO - Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

JF - Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

SN - 1083-6101

IS - 2

ER -