Social Credit Modernism. / Armstrong, Tim.

In: Critical Quarterly, Vol. 55, No. 2, 2013, p. 50-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Published

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Social Credit Modernism. / Armstrong, Tim.

In: Critical Quarterly, Vol. 55, No. 2, 2013, p. 50-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Armstrong, T 2013, 'Social Credit Modernism', Critical Quarterly, vol. 55, no. 2, pp. 50-65.

APA

Armstrong, T. (2013). Social Credit Modernism. Critical Quarterly, 55(2), 50-65.

Vancouver

Armstrong T. Social Credit Modernism. Critical Quarterly. 2013;55(2):50-65.

Author

Armstrong, Tim. / Social Credit Modernism. In: Critical Quarterly. 2013 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 50-65.

BibTeX

@article{11b28d6e83eb4c4eb4356daa14a061e0,
title = "Social Credit Modernism",
abstract = "This article examines a politicised version of modernism produced by a particular moment in the mid-1930s: the novels and other writings produced by Social Creditors John Hargraves and Irene Rathbone. It attempts to identify a 'Social Credit aesthetic' founded on notions of distributed viewpoints across class disvisions. The principal examples are Hargrave's magnum opus SimmerTime Ends (1935) and Ratherbone's They Call It Peace (1936).",
keywords = "Modernism and Politics , Social Credit, John Hargraves, Irene Rathbone, distribution, collective novel",
author = "Tim Armstrong",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "50--65",
journal = "Critical Quarterly",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social Credit Modernism

AU - Armstrong, Tim

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - This article examines a politicised version of modernism produced by a particular moment in the mid-1930s: the novels and other writings produced by Social Creditors John Hargraves and Irene Rathbone. It attempts to identify a 'Social Credit aesthetic' founded on notions of distributed viewpoints across class disvisions. The principal examples are Hargrave's magnum opus SimmerTime Ends (1935) and Ratherbone's They Call It Peace (1936).

AB - This article examines a politicised version of modernism produced by a particular moment in the mid-1930s: the novels and other writings produced by Social Creditors John Hargraves and Irene Rathbone. It attempts to identify a 'Social Credit aesthetic' founded on notions of distributed viewpoints across class disvisions. The principal examples are Hargrave's magnum opus SimmerTime Ends (1935) and Ratherbone's They Call It Peace (1936).

KW - Modernism and Politics

KW - Social Credit

KW - John Hargraves

KW - Irene Rathbone

KW - distribution

KW - collective novel

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 50

EP - 65

JO - Critical Quarterly

JF - Critical Quarterly

IS - 2

ER -