Six-legged Snow Whites: a comment on Nehring et al. / Brown, Mark J F.

In: Current Biology, 09.10.2012.

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Six-legged Snow Whites: a comment on Nehring et al. / Brown, Mark J F.

In: Current Biology, 09.10.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{fd4ee36f59c44920a1cfef3e4aacc2d3,
title = "Six-legged Snow Whites: a comment on Nehring et al.",
abstract = "Social insect queens are a classic example of polyphenism, with a phenotype focused on reproduction generated by the same genome that produces their sterile sister workers. Recently, it was reported that wingless virgin queens of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants assume worker roles when they fail to disperse and found new colonies [1]. This was interpreted as the (re-)evolution of worker behaviour, resulting in inclusive fitness benefits, with the authors suggesting that this was the first observation of such behaviour in queens of species with single-queen colonies and a dispersal-based mating flight [1]. However, worker-like behaviour in virgin wingless queens has been previously reported in two other species of Acromyrmex [2] and in the seed-harvesting ant Messor andrei [3], all of which share these colony characteristics. These previous reports shed more light on this unusual behaviour.",
author = "Brown, {Mark J F}",
year = "2012",
month = oct,
day = "9",
language = "English",
journal = "Current Biology ",
issn = "0960-9822",
publisher = "Cell Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Six-legged Snow Whites: a comment on Nehring et al.

AU - Brown, Mark J F

PY - 2012/10/9

Y1 - 2012/10/9

N2 - Social insect queens are a classic example of polyphenism, with a phenotype focused on reproduction generated by the same genome that produces their sterile sister workers. Recently, it was reported that wingless virgin queens of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants assume worker roles when they fail to disperse and found new colonies [1]. This was interpreted as the (re-)evolution of worker behaviour, resulting in inclusive fitness benefits, with the authors suggesting that this was the first observation of such behaviour in queens of species with single-queen colonies and a dispersal-based mating flight [1]. However, worker-like behaviour in virgin wingless queens has been previously reported in two other species of Acromyrmex [2] and in the seed-harvesting ant Messor andrei [3], all of which share these colony characteristics. These previous reports shed more light on this unusual behaviour.

AB - Social insect queens are a classic example of polyphenism, with a phenotype focused on reproduction generated by the same genome that produces their sterile sister workers. Recently, it was reported that wingless virgin queens of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants assume worker roles when they fail to disperse and found new colonies [1]. This was interpreted as the (re-)evolution of worker behaviour, resulting in inclusive fitness benefits, with the authors suggesting that this was the first observation of such behaviour in queens of species with single-queen colonies and a dispersal-based mating flight [1]. However, worker-like behaviour in virgin wingless queens has been previously reported in two other species of Acromyrmex [2] and in the seed-harvesting ant Messor andrei [3], all of which share these colony characteristics. These previous reports shed more light on this unusual behaviour.

M3 - Article

JO - Current Biology

JF - Current Biology

SN - 0960-9822

ER -