Securing the neoliberal city: Discourses of creativity and priority neighbourhoods in Toronto, Canada. / Leslie, Deborah; Hunt, Mia.

In: Urban Geography, 2013, p. 1-22.

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Abstract

This paper examines the convergence between the discourse of the creative city and the discourse on priority neighborhoods within urban policy imaginaries in Toronto, Canada. In particular, it examines the development of a number of arts programs targeted at low-income neighborhoods in the city. The twin objectives of these programs are to (a) foster creative and entrepreneurial subjectivities among ?at-risk? youth, and (b) reduce the risk of violence that is presumed to be associated with youths living in poor neighborhoods. The paper analyzes how these two discourses are intertwined in a neoliberal politics devoted to enhancing regional quality-of-life competitiveness and to branding Toronto as an attractive creative-class destination. Key words: creative city, poverty, low-income neighborhoods, neoliberalism, Toronto.]; This paper examines the convergence between the discourse of the creative city and the discourse on priority neighborhoods within urban policy imaginaries in Toronto, Canada. In particular, it examines the development of a number of arts programs targeted at low-income neighborhoods in the city. The twin objectives of these programs are to (a) foster creative and entrepreneurial subjectivities among ?at-risk? youth, and (b) reduce the risk of violence that is presumed to be associated with youths living in poor neighborhoods. The paper analyzes how these two discourses are intertwined in a neoliberal politics devoted to enhancing regional quality-of-life competitiveness and to branding Toronto as an attractive creative-class destination.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-22
Number of pages22
JournalUrban Geography
Early online date6 Sep 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
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ID: 17870417