Secure e-Payment Portal Solutions Using Mobile Technologies and Citizen Identity Scheme. / Chen, Calvin.

2013. 229 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

Unpublished

Abstract

The increasing technical capabilities of mobile phones have resulted in several mobile payment (m-payment) methods being proposed. Handsets like smartphones provide powerful computation capability that allow applications
such as m-payment transactions to become more secure and intuitive to users.
Near Field Communication (NFC) technology has been considered as a potential killer technology that will greatly impact the way mobile devices are used.

NFC is a short range wireless communication interface that allows the integration of a mobile device into existing contactless infrastructures. It offers the potential for advanced cryptographic calculations for security protection, with the convenience of mobile phone usage. Within this thesis, a number of existing technologies are introduced and used in conjunction with NFC.

NFC enhances a range of applications such as contactless payment, ticketing,
transportation, user identification, and data access. Three different kinds of
m-payment systems are proposed in this thesis, all of which are principally
Mobile Network Operator (MNO) centric rather than based around a con-
ventional Bank Issuer. The research focus is on achieving secure payment
transactions and user authentication within a conventional merchant paymen-
t environment. The proposed solutions exploit different existing technologies
such as Second-Generation wireless telephone technology(2G), Third-
Generation wireless telephone technology (3G), and Citizen Identity
Cards and Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) combined with NFC to pro-
vide strong security and ease of use.

An important design goal was to re-use as much as possible of the existing
mobile technology security so that the proposed solutions could be readily
implemented into current Infrastructure, and provide secure, manageable, scalable and ubiquitous m-payment services.

This thesis describes the critical technologies and then presents the design and
analysis of the proposed m-payment solutions.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationPh.D.
Awarding Institution
Supervisors/Advisors
Award date1 Jun 2013
Publication statusUnpublished - 2013
This open access research output is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

ID: 17030917