Revealing the hidden niche of cryptic bumblebees in Great Britain : Implications for conservation. / Scriven, Jessica J; Woodall, Lucy C; Tinsley, Matthew C; Knight, Mairi; Williams, Paul H; Carolan, James C; Brown, Mark J F; Goulson, Dave.

In: Biological Conservation, Vol. 182, 02.2015, p. 126-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Revealing the hidden niche of cryptic bumblebees in Great Britain : Implications for conservation. / Scriven, Jessica J; Woodall, Lucy C; Tinsley, Matthew C; Knight, Mairi; Williams, Paul H; Carolan, James C; Brown, Mark J F; Goulson, Dave.

In: Biological Conservation, Vol. 182, 02.2015, p. 126-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Scriven, JJ, Woodall, LC, Tinsley, MC, Knight, M, Williams, PH, Carolan, JC, Brown, MJF & Goulson, D 2015, 'Revealing the hidden niche of cryptic bumblebees in Great Britain: Implications for conservation', Biological Conservation, vol. 182, pp. 126-133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2014.11.027

APA

Scriven, J. J., Woodall, L. C., Tinsley, M. C., Knight, M., Williams, P. H., Carolan, J. C., Brown, M. J. F., & Goulson, D. (2015). Revealing the hidden niche of cryptic bumblebees in Great Britain: Implications for conservation. Biological Conservation, 182, 126-133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2014.11.027

Vancouver

Scriven JJ, Woodall LC, Tinsley MC, Knight M, Williams PH, Carolan JC et al. Revealing the hidden niche of cryptic bumblebees in Great Britain: Implications for conservation. Biological Conservation. 2015 Feb;182:126-133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2014.11.027

Author

Scriven, Jessica J ; Woodall, Lucy C ; Tinsley, Matthew C ; Knight, Mairi ; Williams, Paul H ; Carolan, James C ; Brown, Mark J F ; Goulson, Dave. / Revealing the hidden niche of cryptic bumblebees in Great Britain : Implications for conservation. In: Biological Conservation. 2015 ; Vol. 182. pp. 126-133.

BibTeX

@article{9d4b0b3b007c4ddab8e35b35fff699a6,
title = "Revealing the hidden niche of cryptic bumblebees in Great Britain: Implications for conservation",
abstract = "Bumblebees are ecologically and economically important, and some species have suffered dramatic population declines. The absence of morphological diagnostic characters for the identification of some species creates difficulties for basic ecological studies, and for conservation management. The widespread and commercially exploited bumblebee subgenus Bombus sensu stricto contains a cryptic species complex, known as the lucorum complex, which in Europe comprises B. lucorum, B. cryptarum and B. magnus. Little is known about these species and much of what has been reported is likely to have suffered from incorrect identification. Although the lucorum complex as a whole is common in Great Britain, we aimed to determine whether the populations of the individual species are vulnerable and require conservation action. Using genetic methods to distinguish them, we determined the geographic distribution and abundance of the lucorum complex species in Great Britain, and assessed the extent of niche differentiation between these species. We detected major differences in the geographic range, forage use and sensitivity to summer temperatures of the three species. Bombus lucorum was found to have the broadest distribution and diet, being present throughout mainland Great Britain, whereas B. cryptarum and B. magnus were absent from large areas of central and southern England. Bombus cryptarum and B. magnus were more likely to be found at sites with lower summer temperatures. Bombus magnus, the least abundant species, was found to exhibit an unusually tight biotope association with heathland habitat. This has conservation implications for B. magnus given the current threats to this habitat type.",
author = "Scriven, {Jessica J} and Woodall, {Lucy C} and Tinsley, {Matthew C} and Mairi Knight and Williams, {Paul H} and Carolan, {James C} and Brown, {Mark J F} and Dave Goulson",
year = "2015",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1016/j.biocon.2014.11.027",
language = "English",
volume = "182",
pages = "126--133",
journal = "Biological Conservation",
issn = "0006-3207",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Revealing the hidden niche of cryptic bumblebees in Great Britain

T2 - Implications for conservation

AU - Scriven, Jessica J

AU - Woodall, Lucy C

AU - Tinsley, Matthew C

AU - Knight, Mairi

AU - Williams, Paul H

AU - Carolan, James C

AU - Brown, Mark J F

AU - Goulson, Dave

PY - 2015/2

Y1 - 2015/2

N2 - Bumblebees are ecologically and economically important, and some species have suffered dramatic population declines. The absence of morphological diagnostic characters for the identification of some species creates difficulties for basic ecological studies, and for conservation management. The widespread and commercially exploited bumblebee subgenus Bombus sensu stricto contains a cryptic species complex, known as the lucorum complex, which in Europe comprises B. lucorum, B. cryptarum and B. magnus. Little is known about these species and much of what has been reported is likely to have suffered from incorrect identification. Although the lucorum complex as a whole is common in Great Britain, we aimed to determine whether the populations of the individual species are vulnerable and require conservation action. Using genetic methods to distinguish them, we determined the geographic distribution and abundance of the lucorum complex species in Great Britain, and assessed the extent of niche differentiation between these species. We detected major differences in the geographic range, forage use and sensitivity to summer temperatures of the three species. Bombus lucorum was found to have the broadest distribution and diet, being present throughout mainland Great Britain, whereas B. cryptarum and B. magnus were absent from large areas of central and southern England. Bombus cryptarum and B. magnus were more likely to be found at sites with lower summer temperatures. Bombus magnus, the least abundant species, was found to exhibit an unusually tight biotope association with heathland habitat. This has conservation implications for B. magnus given the current threats to this habitat type.

AB - Bumblebees are ecologically and economically important, and some species have suffered dramatic population declines. The absence of morphological diagnostic characters for the identification of some species creates difficulties for basic ecological studies, and for conservation management. The widespread and commercially exploited bumblebee subgenus Bombus sensu stricto contains a cryptic species complex, known as the lucorum complex, which in Europe comprises B. lucorum, B. cryptarum and B. magnus. Little is known about these species and much of what has been reported is likely to have suffered from incorrect identification. Although the lucorum complex as a whole is common in Great Britain, we aimed to determine whether the populations of the individual species are vulnerable and require conservation action. Using genetic methods to distinguish them, we determined the geographic distribution and abundance of the lucorum complex species in Great Britain, and assessed the extent of niche differentiation between these species. We detected major differences in the geographic range, forage use and sensitivity to summer temperatures of the three species. Bombus lucorum was found to have the broadest distribution and diet, being present throughout mainland Great Britain, whereas B. cryptarum and B. magnus were absent from large areas of central and southern England. Bombus cryptarum and B. magnus were more likely to be found at sites with lower summer temperatures. Bombus magnus, the least abundant species, was found to exhibit an unusually tight biotope association with heathland habitat. This has conservation implications for B. magnus given the current threats to this habitat type.

U2 - 10.1016/j.biocon.2014.11.027

DO - 10.1016/j.biocon.2014.11.027

M3 - Article

VL - 182

SP - 126

EP - 133

JO - Biological Conservation

JF - Biological Conservation

SN - 0006-3207

ER -