Rethinking the Smart Card Technology, Invited Paper. / Akram, Raja Naeem; Markantonakis, Konstantinos.

16th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. ed. / Theo Tryfonas; Ioannis Askoxylakis. Springer, 2014.

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Abstract

Creating security architectures and processes that directly interact with consumers, especially in consumer electronics, has to take into account usability, user-experience and skill level. Smart cards provide secure services, even in malicious environments, to end-users with a fairly straightforward limited usage pattern that even an ordinary user can easily deal with. The way the smart card industry achieves this is by limiting users' interactions and privileges on the smart cards they carry around and use to access different services. This centralised control has been the key to providing secure and reliable services through smart cards, while keeping the smart cards fairly useable for end-users. However, as smart cards have permeated into every aspect of modern life, users have ended up carrying multiple cards to perform mundane tasks, making smart card-based services a cumbersome experience. User Centric Smart Cards (UCSC) enable users to have all the services they might be accessing using traditional smart cards on a single device that is under their control. Giving "freedom of choice" to users increases their privileges, but the design requirement is to maintain the same level of security and reliability as traditional architectures while giving better user experience. In this paper, we will discuss the challenges faced by the UCSC proposal in balancing security with usability and "freedom of choice", and how it has resolved them.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication16th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
EditorsTheo Tryfonas, Ioannis Askoxylakis
PublisherSpringer
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2014
This open access research output is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

ID: 23116204