Remotely induced magnetism in a normal metal using a superconducting spin-valve. / Flokstra, Machiel G; Satchell, Nathan; Kim, Jangyong; Burnell, Gavin; Curran, Peter J; Bending, Simon J; Cooper, Joshaniel F K; Kinane, Christian J; Langridge, Sean ; Isidori, Aldo; Pugach, Nataliya; Eschrig, Matthias; Luetkens, Hubertus; Suter, Andreas; Prokscha, Thomas; Lee, Stephen L.

In: Nature Physics, Vol. 12, 01.2016, p. 57-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Remotely induced magnetism in a normal metal using a superconducting spin-valve. / Flokstra, Machiel G; Satchell, Nathan; Kim, Jangyong; Burnell, Gavin; Curran, Peter J; Bending, Simon J; Cooper, Joshaniel F K; Kinane, Christian J; Langridge, Sean ; Isidori, Aldo; Pugach, Nataliya; Eschrig, Matthias; Luetkens, Hubertus; Suter, Andreas; Prokscha, Thomas; Lee, Stephen L.

In: Nature Physics, Vol. 12, 01.2016, p. 57-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Flokstra, MG, Satchell, N, Kim, J, Burnell, G, Curran, PJ, Bending, SJ, Cooper, JFK, Kinane, CJ, Langridge, S, Isidori, A, Pugach, N, Eschrig, M, Luetkens, H, Suter, A, Prokscha, T & Lee, SL 2016, 'Remotely induced magnetism in a normal metal using a superconducting spin-valve', Nature Physics, vol. 12, pp. 57-61. https://doi.org/10.1038/nphys3486

APA

Flokstra, M. G., Satchell, N., Kim, J., Burnell, G., Curran, P. J., Bending, S. J., Cooper, J. F. K., Kinane, C. J., Langridge, S., Isidori, A., Pugach, N., Eschrig, M., Luetkens, H., Suter, A., Prokscha, T., & Lee, S. L. (2016). Remotely induced magnetism in a normal metal using a superconducting spin-valve. Nature Physics, 12, 57-61. https://doi.org/10.1038/nphys3486

Vancouver

Flokstra MG, Satchell N, Kim J, Burnell G, Curran PJ, Bending SJ et al. Remotely induced magnetism in a normal metal using a superconducting spin-valve. Nature Physics. 2016 Jan;12:57-61. https://doi.org/10.1038/nphys3486

Author

Flokstra, Machiel G ; Satchell, Nathan ; Kim, Jangyong ; Burnell, Gavin ; Curran, Peter J ; Bending, Simon J ; Cooper, Joshaniel F K ; Kinane, Christian J ; Langridge, Sean ; Isidori, Aldo ; Pugach, Nataliya ; Eschrig, Matthias ; Luetkens, Hubertus ; Suter, Andreas ; Prokscha, Thomas ; Lee, Stephen L. / Remotely induced magnetism in a normal metal using a superconducting spin-valve. In: Nature Physics. 2016 ; Vol. 12. pp. 57-61.

BibTeX

@article{c6afe7e9965545b78db46eaf8db0a722,
title = "Remotely induced magnetism in a normal metal using a superconducting spin-valve",
abstract = "Superconducting spintronics has emerged in the last decade as a promising new field that seeks to open a new dimension for nanoelectronics by utilizing the internal spin structure of the superconducting Cooper pair as a new degree of freedom. Conventional Cooper pairs are in a spin singlet state, with oppositely aligned spins. The basic building blocks of superconducting spintronics, however, are spin-triplet Cooper pairs with equally aligned spins. Such states are promoted by proximity of a conventional superconductor to a ferromagnetic material with inhomogeneous macroscopic magnetization. A multitude of proof-of-principle type experiments were successfully performed. Currently, the discipline finds itself at the crossroads for developing first-generation devices. One still unresolved issue concerns experimental verification of a theoretically predicted inverse magnetization induced inside a conventional superconductor contacted by a ferromagnet. In search for this phenomenon, using low-energy muon spin rotation experiments, we found an entirely unexpected novel effect: the creation of a magnetization at a remote non-magnetic interface between a metal (gold) and a superconductor (niobium), separated from a ferromagnetic double layer by a distance >50 nm. This remote magnetization depends on the mutual orientation of the magnetizations in the ferromagnetic double layer: it takes its maximum at perpendicular alignment, while it disappears when switching our device into a homogeneous magnetic state. Surprisingly, we observe no magnetization in the superconductor itself. In all respects, the entire structure thus shows unusual non-local spin-valve behaviour, acting over a distance. The effect disappears when the superconductor switches to the normal state. This provides the intriguing possibility to detect remotely the magnetic state of a device via a dissipationless superconducting conduit. It may act as a basic building block for a new generation of quantum interference devices based on the spin of a Cooper pair.",
author = "Flokstra, {Machiel G} and Nathan Satchell and Jangyong Kim and Gavin Burnell and Curran, {Peter J} and Bending, {Simon J} and Cooper, {Joshaniel F K} and Kinane, {Christian J} and Sean Langridge and Aldo Isidori and Nataliya Pugach and Matthias Eschrig and Hubertus Luetkens and Andreas Suter and Thomas Prokscha and Lee, {Stephen L}",
year = "2016",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1038/nphys3486",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "57--61",
journal = "Nature Physics",
issn = "1745-2473",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Remotely induced magnetism in a normal metal using a superconducting spin-valve

AU - Flokstra, Machiel G

AU - Satchell, Nathan

AU - Kim, Jangyong

AU - Burnell, Gavin

AU - Curran, Peter J

AU - Bending, Simon J

AU - Cooper, Joshaniel F K

AU - Kinane, Christian J

AU - Langridge, Sean

AU - Isidori, Aldo

AU - Pugach, Nataliya

AU - Eschrig, Matthias

AU - Luetkens, Hubertus

AU - Suter, Andreas

AU - Prokscha, Thomas

AU - Lee, Stephen L

PY - 2016/1

Y1 - 2016/1

N2 - Superconducting spintronics has emerged in the last decade as a promising new field that seeks to open a new dimension for nanoelectronics by utilizing the internal spin structure of the superconducting Cooper pair as a new degree of freedom. Conventional Cooper pairs are in a spin singlet state, with oppositely aligned spins. The basic building blocks of superconducting spintronics, however, are spin-triplet Cooper pairs with equally aligned spins. Such states are promoted by proximity of a conventional superconductor to a ferromagnetic material with inhomogeneous macroscopic magnetization. A multitude of proof-of-principle type experiments were successfully performed. Currently, the discipline finds itself at the crossroads for developing first-generation devices. One still unresolved issue concerns experimental verification of a theoretically predicted inverse magnetization induced inside a conventional superconductor contacted by a ferromagnet. In search for this phenomenon, using low-energy muon spin rotation experiments, we found an entirely unexpected novel effect: the creation of a magnetization at a remote non-magnetic interface between a metal (gold) and a superconductor (niobium), separated from a ferromagnetic double layer by a distance >50 nm. This remote magnetization depends on the mutual orientation of the magnetizations in the ferromagnetic double layer: it takes its maximum at perpendicular alignment, while it disappears when switching our device into a homogeneous magnetic state. Surprisingly, we observe no magnetization in the superconductor itself. In all respects, the entire structure thus shows unusual non-local spin-valve behaviour, acting over a distance. The effect disappears when the superconductor switches to the normal state. This provides the intriguing possibility to detect remotely the magnetic state of a device via a dissipationless superconducting conduit. It may act as a basic building block for a new generation of quantum interference devices based on the spin of a Cooper pair.

AB - Superconducting spintronics has emerged in the last decade as a promising new field that seeks to open a new dimension for nanoelectronics by utilizing the internal spin structure of the superconducting Cooper pair as a new degree of freedom. Conventional Cooper pairs are in a spin singlet state, with oppositely aligned spins. The basic building blocks of superconducting spintronics, however, are spin-triplet Cooper pairs with equally aligned spins. Such states are promoted by proximity of a conventional superconductor to a ferromagnetic material with inhomogeneous macroscopic magnetization. A multitude of proof-of-principle type experiments were successfully performed. Currently, the discipline finds itself at the crossroads for developing first-generation devices. One still unresolved issue concerns experimental verification of a theoretically predicted inverse magnetization induced inside a conventional superconductor contacted by a ferromagnet. In search for this phenomenon, using low-energy muon spin rotation experiments, we found an entirely unexpected novel effect: the creation of a magnetization at a remote non-magnetic interface between a metal (gold) and a superconductor (niobium), separated from a ferromagnetic double layer by a distance >50 nm. This remote magnetization depends on the mutual orientation of the magnetizations in the ferromagnetic double layer: it takes its maximum at perpendicular alignment, while it disappears when switching our device into a homogeneous magnetic state. Surprisingly, we observe no magnetization in the superconductor itself. In all respects, the entire structure thus shows unusual non-local spin-valve behaviour, acting over a distance. The effect disappears when the superconductor switches to the normal state. This provides the intriguing possibility to detect remotely the magnetic state of a device via a dissipationless superconducting conduit. It may act as a basic building block for a new generation of quantum interference devices based on the spin of a Cooper pair.

U2 - 10.1038/nphys3486

DO - 10.1038/nphys3486

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 57

EP - 61

JO - Nature Physics

JF - Nature Physics

SN - 1745-2473

ER -