Reading with peripheral vision: A comparison of reading dynamic scrolling and static text with a simulated central scotoma. / Harvey, Hannah; Walker, Robin.

In: Vision Research, Vol. 98, 2014, p. 54-60.

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Reading with peripheral vision: A comparison of reading dynamic scrolling and static text with a simulated central scotoma. / Harvey, Hannah; Walker, Robin.

In: Vision Research, Vol. 98, 2014, p. 54-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{682d432c8cc34709a18a377e70de502e,
title = "Reading with peripheral vision: A comparison of reading dynamic scrolling and static text with a simulated central scotoma",
abstract = "Horizontally scrolling text is, in theory, ideally suited to enhance viewing strategies recommended to improve reading performance under conditions of central vision loss such as macular disease, although it is largely unproven in this regard. This study investigated if the use of scrolling text produced an observable improvement in reading performed under conditions of eccentric viewing in an artificial scotoma paradigm. Participants (n = 17) read scrolling and static text with a central artificial scotoma controlled by an eye-tracker. There was an improvement in measures of reading accuracy, and adherence to eccentric viewing strategies with scrolling, compared to static, text. These findings illustrate the potential benefits of scrolling text as a potential reading aid for those with central vision loss.",
author = "Hannah Harvey and Robin Walker",
year = "2014",
doi = "http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2014.03.009",
language = "English",
volume = "98",
pages = "54--60",
journal = "Vision Research",
issn = "0042-6989",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reading with peripheral vision: A comparison of reading dynamic scrolling and static text with a simulated central scotoma

AU - Harvey, Hannah

AU - Walker, Robin

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Horizontally scrolling text is, in theory, ideally suited to enhance viewing strategies recommended to improve reading performance under conditions of central vision loss such as macular disease, although it is largely unproven in this regard. This study investigated if the use of scrolling text produced an observable improvement in reading performed under conditions of eccentric viewing in an artificial scotoma paradigm. Participants (n = 17) read scrolling and static text with a central artificial scotoma controlled by an eye-tracker. There was an improvement in measures of reading accuracy, and adherence to eccentric viewing strategies with scrolling, compared to static, text. These findings illustrate the potential benefits of scrolling text as a potential reading aid for those with central vision loss.

AB - Horizontally scrolling text is, in theory, ideally suited to enhance viewing strategies recommended to improve reading performance under conditions of central vision loss such as macular disease, although it is largely unproven in this regard. This study investigated if the use of scrolling text produced an observable improvement in reading performed under conditions of eccentric viewing in an artificial scotoma paradigm. Participants (n = 17) read scrolling and static text with a central artificial scotoma controlled by an eye-tracker. There was an improvement in measures of reading accuracy, and adherence to eccentric viewing strategies with scrolling, compared to static, text. These findings illustrate the potential benefits of scrolling text as a potential reading aid for those with central vision loss.

U2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2014.03.009

DO - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2014.03.009

M3 - Article

VL - 98

SP - 54

EP - 60

JO - Vision Research

JF - Vision Research

SN - 0042-6989

ER -