Predictors of distress in women with breast cancer: The importance of illness perceptions. / Gibbons, Andrea; Groarke, AnnMarie; Curtis, Ruth; Keane, Anne Marie.

In: Psychology and Health, Vol. 27, No. Suppl 1, 2012, p. 215.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstractpeer-review

Published

Standard

Predictors of distress in women with breast cancer: The importance of illness perceptions. / Gibbons, Andrea; Groarke, AnnMarie; Curtis, Ruth; Keane, Anne Marie.

In: Psychology and Health, Vol. 27, No. Suppl 1, 2012, p. 215.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstractpeer-review

Harvard

Gibbons, A, Groarke, A, Curtis, R & Keane, AM 2012, 'Predictors of distress in women with breast cancer: The importance of illness perceptions', Psychology and Health, vol. 27, no. Suppl 1, pp. 215.

APA

Gibbons, A., Groarke, A., Curtis, R., & Keane, A. M. (2012). Predictors of distress in women with breast cancer: The importance of illness perceptions. Psychology and Health, 27(Suppl 1), 215.

Vancouver

Gibbons A, Groarke A, Curtis R, Keane AM. Predictors of distress in women with breast cancer: The importance of illness perceptions. Psychology and Health. 2012;27(Suppl 1):215.

Author

Gibbons, Andrea ; Groarke, AnnMarie ; Curtis, Ruth ; Keane, Anne Marie. / Predictors of distress in women with breast cancer: The importance of illness perceptions. In: Psychology and Health. 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. Suppl 1. pp. 215.

BibTeX

@article{636a12318ad64a13a6e13b08da65b5cd,
title = "Predictors of distress in women with breast cancer: The importance of illness perceptions",
abstract = "Background: The present study assessed the impact of illness perceptions and coping on distress in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods: Women with breast cancer (N =100) completed measures of illness perceptions (IPQ-R), anxiety (STAI), perceived stress (PSS), coping (MAC), and positive and negative affect (PANAS). Findings: Controlling for disease and demographic variables, illness perceptions accounted for 30% of depression, 15% of perceived stress, and 15% of state anxiety. Higher personal control beliefs (p < .05), and a stronger illness identity (p < .01), predicted higher levels of depression. Reporting more serious consequences predicted more perceived stress, whilst having a better understanding of the illness predicted lower anxiety (p < .05). Higher levels of fighting spirit (p < .001), and low levels of fatalistic coping (p < .05) predicted higher positive affect. Discussion: Both illness perceptions and coping should be considered when developing future interventions to reduce distress.",
author = "Andrea Gibbons and AnnMarie Groarke and Ruth Curtis and Keane, {Anne Marie}",
year = "2012",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "215",
journal = "Psychology and Health",
issn = "0887-0446",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "Suppl 1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors of distress in women with breast cancer: The importance of illness perceptions

AU - Gibbons, Andrea

AU - Groarke, AnnMarie

AU - Curtis, Ruth

AU - Keane, Anne Marie

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Background: The present study assessed the impact of illness perceptions and coping on distress in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods: Women with breast cancer (N =100) completed measures of illness perceptions (IPQ-R), anxiety (STAI), perceived stress (PSS), coping (MAC), and positive and negative affect (PANAS). Findings: Controlling for disease and demographic variables, illness perceptions accounted for 30% of depression, 15% of perceived stress, and 15% of state anxiety. Higher personal control beliefs (p < .05), and a stronger illness identity (p < .01), predicted higher levels of depression. Reporting more serious consequences predicted more perceived stress, whilst having a better understanding of the illness predicted lower anxiety (p < .05). Higher levels of fighting spirit (p < .001), and low levels of fatalistic coping (p < .05) predicted higher positive affect. Discussion: Both illness perceptions and coping should be considered when developing future interventions to reduce distress.

AB - Background: The present study assessed the impact of illness perceptions and coping on distress in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods: Women with breast cancer (N =100) completed measures of illness perceptions (IPQ-R), anxiety (STAI), perceived stress (PSS), coping (MAC), and positive and negative affect (PANAS). Findings: Controlling for disease and demographic variables, illness perceptions accounted for 30% of depression, 15% of perceived stress, and 15% of state anxiety. Higher personal control beliefs (p < .05), and a stronger illness identity (p < .01), predicted higher levels of depression. Reporting more serious consequences predicted more perceived stress, whilst having a better understanding of the illness predicted lower anxiety (p < .05). Higher levels of fighting spirit (p < .001), and low levels of fatalistic coping (p < .05) predicted higher positive affect. Discussion: Both illness perceptions and coping should be considered when developing future interventions to reduce distress.

M3 - Meeting abstract

VL - 27

SP - 215

JO - Psychology and Health

JF - Psychology and Health

SN - 0887-0446

IS - Suppl 1

ER -