Post-marital residence patterns show lineage-specific evolution. / Moravec, Jiří; Atkinson, Quentin; Bowern, Claire; Greenhill, Simon; Jordan, Fiona; Ross, Robert; Gray, Russell; Marsland, Stephen; Cox, Murray.

In: Evolution and Human Behavior, Vol. 39, No. 6, 11.2018, p. 594-601.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Published

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Post-marital residence patterns show lineage-specific evolution. / Moravec, Jiří; Atkinson, Quentin; Bowern, Claire; Greenhill, Simon; Jordan, Fiona; Ross, Robert; Gray, Russell; Marsland, Stephen; Cox, Murray.

In: Evolution and Human Behavior, Vol. 39, No. 6, 11.2018, p. 594-601.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Moravec, J, Atkinson, Q, Bowern, C, Greenhill, S, Jordan, F, Ross, R, Gray, R, Marsland, S & Cox, M 2018, 'Post-marital residence patterns show lineage-specific evolution', Evolution and Human Behavior, vol. 39, no. 6, pp. 594-601. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2018.06.002

APA

Moravec, J., Atkinson, Q., Bowern, C., Greenhill, S., Jordan, F., Ross, R., Gray, R., Marsland, S., & Cox, M. (2018). Post-marital residence patterns show lineage-specific evolution. Evolution and Human Behavior, 39(6), 594-601. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2018.06.002

Vancouver

Moravec J, Atkinson Q, Bowern C, Greenhill S, Jordan F, Ross R et al. Post-marital residence patterns show lineage-specific evolution. Evolution and Human Behavior. 2018 Nov;39(6):594-601. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2018.06.002

Author

Moravec, Jiří ; Atkinson, Quentin ; Bowern, Claire ; Greenhill, Simon ; Jordan, Fiona ; Ross, Robert ; Gray, Russell ; Marsland, Stephen ; Cox, Murray. / Post-marital residence patterns show lineage-specific evolution. In: Evolution and Human Behavior. 2018 ; Vol. 39, No. 6. pp. 594-601.

BibTeX

@article{5aa17e1b6b764dbb8c046cf0e8254caf,
title = "Post-marital residence patterns show lineage-specific evolution",
abstract = "Where a newly-married couple lives, termed post marital residence, varies cross-culturally and changes over time. While many factors have been proposed as drivers of this change, among them general features of human societies like warfare, migration and gendered division of subsistence labour, little is known about whether changes in residence patterns exhibit global regularities. Here, we study ethnographic observations of post-marital residence in societies from five large language families (Austronesian, Bantu, Indo-European, Pama-Nyungan and Uto-Aztecan), encompassing 371 ethnolinguistic groups ranging widely in local ecologies and lifeways, and covering over half the world{\textquoteright}s population and geographical area.",
author = "Ji{\v r}{\'i} Moravec and Quentin Atkinson and Claire Bowern and Simon Greenhill and Fiona Jordan and Robert Ross and Russell Gray and Stephen Marsland and Murray Cox",
year = "2018",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2018.06.002",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "594--601",
journal = "Evolution and Human Behavior",
issn = "1090-5138",
publisher = "ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Post-marital residence patterns show lineage-specific evolution

AU - Moravec, Jiří

AU - Atkinson, Quentin

AU - Bowern, Claire

AU - Greenhill, Simon

AU - Jordan, Fiona

AU - Ross, Robert

AU - Gray, Russell

AU - Marsland, Stephen

AU - Cox, Murray

PY - 2018/11

Y1 - 2018/11

N2 - Where a newly-married couple lives, termed post marital residence, varies cross-culturally and changes over time. While many factors have been proposed as drivers of this change, among them general features of human societies like warfare, migration and gendered division of subsistence labour, little is known about whether changes in residence patterns exhibit global regularities. Here, we study ethnographic observations of post-marital residence in societies from five large language families (Austronesian, Bantu, Indo-European, Pama-Nyungan and Uto-Aztecan), encompassing 371 ethnolinguistic groups ranging widely in local ecologies and lifeways, and covering over half the world’s population and geographical area.

AB - Where a newly-married couple lives, termed post marital residence, varies cross-culturally and changes over time. While many factors have been proposed as drivers of this change, among them general features of human societies like warfare, migration and gendered division of subsistence labour, little is known about whether changes in residence patterns exhibit global regularities. Here, we study ethnographic observations of post-marital residence in societies from five large language families (Austronesian, Bantu, Indo-European, Pama-Nyungan and Uto-Aztecan), encompassing 371 ethnolinguistic groups ranging widely in local ecologies and lifeways, and covering over half the world’s population and geographical area.

U2 - 10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2018.06.002

DO - 10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2018.06.002

M3 - Article

VL - 39

SP - 594

EP - 601

JO - Evolution and Human Behavior

JF - Evolution and Human Behavior

SN - 1090-5138

IS - 6

ER -