Medicalisation, pharmaceuticalisation, or both? Exploring the medical management of sleeplessness as insomnia. / Coveney, Catherine; Williams, Simon; Gabe, Jonathan.

In: Sociology of Health and Illness , Vol. 41, No. 2, 02.2019, p. 266-284.

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Medicalisation, pharmaceuticalisation, or both? Exploring the medical management of sleeplessness as insomnia. / Coveney, Catherine; Williams, Simon; Gabe, Jonathan.

In: Sociology of Health and Illness , Vol. 41, No. 2, 02.2019, p. 266-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Coveney, Catherine ; Williams, Simon ; Gabe, Jonathan. / Medicalisation, pharmaceuticalisation, or both? Exploring the medical management of sleeplessness as insomnia. In: Sociology of Health and Illness . 2019 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 266-284.

BibTeX

@article{5e639e885ef846d9bb41c02935b6d57e,
title = "Medicalisation, pharmaceuticalisation, or both? Exploring the medical management of sleeplessness as insomnia",
abstract = "In this paper we examine the medical management of sleeplessness as {\textquoteleft}insomnia{\textquoteright}, through the eyes of general practitioners (GPs) and sleep experts in Britain. Three key themes were evident in the data. These related to (i) institutional issues around advocacy and training in sleep medicine (ii) conceptual issues in the diagnosis of insomnia (iii) and how these played out in terms of treatment issues. As a result, the bulk of medical management occurred at the primary rather than secondary care level. These issues are then reflected on in terms of the light they shed on relations between the medicalisation and the pharmaceuticalisation of sleeplessness as insomnia. Sleeplessness, we suggest, is only partially and problematically medicalised as insomnia to date at the conceptual, institutional and interactional levels owing to the foregoing factors. Much of this moreover, on closer inspection, is arguably better captured through recourse to pharmaceuticalisation, including countervailing moves and downward regulatory pressures which suggest a possible degree of depharmaceuticalisation in future, at least as far prescription hypnoticsare concerned. Pharmaceuticalisation therefore, we conclude, has distinct analytical value in directing our attention, in this particular case, to important dynamics occurring within if not beyond the medicalisation of sleeplessness as insomnia.",
keywords = "medicalisation, sleep, interviews, drugs/medications, primary care",
author = "Catherine Coveney and Simon Williams and Jonathan Gabe",
year = "2019",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1111/1467-9566.12820",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "266--284",
journal = "Sociology of Health and Illness ",
issn = "0141-9889",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Medicalisation, pharmaceuticalisation, or both? Exploring the medical management of sleeplessness as insomnia

AU - Coveney, Catherine

AU - Williams, Simon

AU - Gabe, Jonathan

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - In this paper we examine the medical management of sleeplessness as ‘insomnia’, through the eyes of general practitioners (GPs) and sleep experts in Britain. Three key themes were evident in the data. These related to (i) institutional issues around advocacy and training in sleep medicine (ii) conceptual issues in the diagnosis of insomnia (iii) and how these played out in terms of treatment issues. As a result, the bulk of medical management occurred at the primary rather than secondary care level. These issues are then reflected on in terms of the light they shed on relations between the medicalisation and the pharmaceuticalisation of sleeplessness as insomnia. Sleeplessness, we suggest, is only partially and problematically medicalised as insomnia to date at the conceptual, institutional and interactional levels owing to the foregoing factors. Much of this moreover, on closer inspection, is arguably better captured through recourse to pharmaceuticalisation, including countervailing moves and downward regulatory pressures which suggest a possible degree of depharmaceuticalisation in future, at least as far prescription hypnoticsare concerned. Pharmaceuticalisation therefore, we conclude, has distinct analytical value in directing our attention, in this particular case, to important dynamics occurring within if not beyond the medicalisation of sleeplessness as insomnia.

AB - In this paper we examine the medical management of sleeplessness as ‘insomnia’, through the eyes of general practitioners (GPs) and sleep experts in Britain. Three key themes were evident in the data. These related to (i) institutional issues around advocacy and training in sleep medicine (ii) conceptual issues in the diagnosis of insomnia (iii) and how these played out in terms of treatment issues. As a result, the bulk of medical management occurred at the primary rather than secondary care level. These issues are then reflected on in terms of the light they shed on relations between the medicalisation and the pharmaceuticalisation of sleeplessness as insomnia. Sleeplessness, we suggest, is only partially and problematically medicalised as insomnia to date at the conceptual, institutional and interactional levels owing to the foregoing factors. Much of this moreover, on closer inspection, is arguably better captured through recourse to pharmaceuticalisation, including countervailing moves and downward regulatory pressures which suggest a possible degree of depharmaceuticalisation in future, at least as far prescription hypnoticsare concerned. Pharmaceuticalisation therefore, we conclude, has distinct analytical value in directing our attention, in this particular case, to important dynamics occurring within if not beyond the medicalisation of sleeplessness as insomnia.

KW - medicalisation

KW - sleep

KW - interviews

KW - drugs/medications

KW - primary care

U2 - 10.1111/1467-9566.12820

DO - 10.1111/1467-9566.12820

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 266

EP - 284

JO - Sociology of Health and Illness

JF - Sociology of Health and Illness

SN - 0141-9889

IS - 2

ER -