“Making a Rosebud of her Mouth”: Erotics, Semiotics and Agency in the Dickensian Female Mouth. / Ramuz, Colette.

Dickens and Women Reobserved. ed. / Edward Guiliano. Brighton, England : Edward Everett Root Publishers Co. Ltd., 2020.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Published

Standard

“Making a Rosebud of her Mouth”: Erotics, Semiotics and Agency in the Dickensian Female Mouth. / Ramuz, Colette.

Dickens and Women Reobserved. ed. / Edward Guiliano. Brighton, England : Edward Everett Root Publishers Co. Ltd., 2020.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Harvard

Ramuz, C 2020, “Making a Rosebud of her Mouth”: Erotics, Semiotics and Agency in the Dickensian Female Mouth. in E Guiliano (ed.), Dickens and Women Reobserved. Edward Everett Root Publishers Co. Ltd., Brighton, England.

APA

Ramuz, C. (2020). “Making a Rosebud of her Mouth”: Erotics, Semiotics and Agency in the Dickensian Female Mouth. In E. Guiliano (Ed.), Dickens and Women Reobserved Edward Everett Root Publishers Co. Ltd..

Vancouver

Ramuz C. “Making a Rosebud of her Mouth”: Erotics, Semiotics and Agency in the Dickensian Female Mouth. In Guiliano E, editor, Dickens and Women Reobserved. Brighton, England: Edward Everett Root Publishers Co. Ltd. 2020

Author

Ramuz, Colette. / “Making a Rosebud of her Mouth”: Erotics, Semiotics and Agency in the Dickensian Female Mouth. Dickens and Women Reobserved. editor / Edward Guiliano. Brighton, England : Edward Everett Root Publishers Co. Ltd., 2020.

BibTeX

@inbook{aa7115e009cb491d9d8c43c111db8a54,
title = "“Making a Rosebud of her Mouth”: Erotics, Semiotics and Agency in the Dickensian Female Mouth",
abstract = "In Dickens scholarship, while there is no shortage of work on women as sexual objects, there is little on female sexual agency. The indistinct Dickensian female body is often considered a stereotype and his women appear to lack autonomy and certainly sexual agency. But if we evaluate Dickens{\textquoteright} female characters through a realist lens, it does not take account of the semiotics and erotics of the Dickensian body, in particular those of the mouth. The mouth has a long history as a visual and textual metaphor of incorporation, particularly sexual incorporation. Lips, tongue and teeth constitute the meeting point between erotic corporeality and language yet, critically, the mouth in nineteenth-century literature has often been overlooked in favour of the ocular. I argue that mouths in general, and female mouths in particular, deserve more attention as viable hermeneutic signs of female sexuality in Dickens{\textquoteright} work. In reobserving Dickens{\textquoteright} women, I show how sexual agency is legible through the erotics and semiotics of the female mouth and draw out the ways in which the mouth is a crucial signifier: linguistically, metaphorically, sexually, and psychically. This means that while a Dickensian mouth is sometimes just a mouth, it can also function as a powerful system of signs. In paying attention to these signs and poetics, Dickens{\textquoteright} “rosy lips” and “feline jaws” are then perceived strikingly afresh: from the rose/rosebud figures which function as metonyms for female sexual anatomy and the blooming of sexuality, to the feline signifiers, “Pussy” and “tigress”, as a well-known anatomical reference, and as Victorian symbolism for promiscuous female sexuality and lustful appetites. This chapter will show that taking account of Dickens{\textquoteright} oral imagination offers a new reading of Dickens{\textquoteright} women; it will reveal how in recalibrating rose and feline metaphors, he transforms the female sexual object into sexual agent.",
author = "Colette Ramuz",
year = "2020",
month = may,
day = "31",
language = "English",
isbn = "1913087204",
editor = "Edward Guiliano",
booktitle = "Dickens and Women Reobserved",
publisher = "Edward Everett Root Publishers Co. Ltd.",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - “Making a Rosebud of her Mouth”: Erotics, Semiotics and Agency in the Dickensian Female Mouth

AU - Ramuz, Colette

PY - 2020/5/31

Y1 - 2020/5/31

N2 - In Dickens scholarship, while there is no shortage of work on women as sexual objects, there is little on female sexual agency. The indistinct Dickensian female body is often considered a stereotype and his women appear to lack autonomy and certainly sexual agency. But if we evaluate Dickens’ female characters through a realist lens, it does not take account of the semiotics and erotics of the Dickensian body, in particular those of the mouth. The mouth has a long history as a visual and textual metaphor of incorporation, particularly sexual incorporation. Lips, tongue and teeth constitute the meeting point between erotic corporeality and language yet, critically, the mouth in nineteenth-century literature has often been overlooked in favour of the ocular. I argue that mouths in general, and female mouths in particular, deserve more attention as viable hermeneutic signs of female sexuality in Dickens’ work. In reobserving Dickens’ women, I show how sexual agency is legible through the erotics and semiotics of the female mouth and draw out the ways in which the mouth is a crucial signifier: linguistically, metaphorically, sexually, and psychically. This means that while a Dickensian mouth is sometimes just a mouth, it can also function as a powerful system of signs. In paying attention to these signs and poetics, Dickens’ “rosy lips” and “feline jaws” are then perceived strikingly afresh: from the rose/rosebud figures which function as metonyms for female sexual anatomy and the blooming of sexuality, to the feline signifiers, “Pussy” and “tigress”, as a well-known anatomical reference, and as Victorian symbolism for promiscuous female sexuality and lustful appetites. This chapter will show that taking account of Dickens’ oral imagination offers a new reading of Dickens’ women; it will reveal how in recalibrating rose and feline metaphors, he transforms the female sexual object into sexual agent.

AB - In Dickens scholarship, while there is no shortage of work on women as sexual objects, there is little on female sexual agency. The indistinct Dickensian female body is often considered a stereotype and his women appear to lack autonomy and certainly sexual agency. But if we evaluate Dickens’ female characters through a realist lens, it does not take account of the semiotics and erotics of the Dickensian body, in particular those of the mouth. The mouth has a long history as a visual and textual metaphor of incorporation, particularly sexual incorporation. Lips, tongue and teeth constitute the meeting point between erotic corporeality and language yet, critically, the mouth in nineteenth-century literature has often been overlooked in favour of the ocular. I argue that mouths in general, and female mouths in particular, deserve more attention as viable hermeneutic signs of female sexuality in Dickens’ work. In reobserving Dickens’ women, I show how sexual agency is legible through the erotics and semiotics of the female mouth and draw out the ways in which the mouth is a crucial signifier: linguistically, metaphorically, sexually, and psychically. This means that while a Dickensian mouth is sometimes just a mouth, it can also function as a powerful system of signs. In paying attention to these signs and poetics, Dickens’ “rosy lips” and “feline jaws” are then perceived strikingly afresh: from the rose/rosebud figures which function as metonyms for female sexual anatomy and the blooming of sexuality, to the feline signifiers, “Pussy” and “tigress”, as a well-known anatomical reference, and as Victorian symbolism for promiscuous female sexuality and lustful appetites. This chapter will show that taking account of Dickens’ oral imagination offers a new reading of Dickens’ women; it will reveal how in recalibrating rose and feline metaphors, he transforms the female sexual object into sexual agent.

M3 - Chapter

SN - 1913087204

BT - Dickens and Women Reobserved

A2 - Guiliano, Edward

PB - Edward Everett Root Publishers Co. Ltd.

CY - Brighton, England

ER -