Long Workweeks and Strange Hours. / Hamermesh, Daniel.

In: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 68, No. 5, 01.10.2015, p. 1007-1018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Long Workweeks and Strange Hours. / Hamermesh, Daniel.

In: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 68, No. 5, 01.10.2015, p. 1007-1018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Hamermesh, D 2015, 'Long Workweeks and Strange Hours', Industrial and Labor Relations Review, vol. 68, no. 5, pp. 1007-1018. https://doi.org/10.1177/0019793915592375

APA

Hamermesh, D. (2015). Long Workweeks and Strange Hours. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 68(5), 1007-1018. https://doi.org/10.1177/0019793915592375

Vancouver

Hamermesh D. Long Workweeks and Strange Hours. Industrial and Labor Relations Review. 2015 Oct 1;68(5):1007-1018. https://doi.org/10.1177/0019793915592375

Author

Hamermesh, Daniel. / Long Workweeks and Strange Hours. In: Industrial and Labor Relations Review. 2015 ; Vol. 68, No. 5. pp. 1007-1018.

BibTeX

@article{761b78e126bd4a07a5f7b6c9deba0cc1,
title = "Long Workweeks and Strange Hours",
abstract = "American workweeks are long compared to other rich countries{\textquoteright}. Much less well-known is that Americans are more likely to work at night and on weekends. We examine the relationship between these two phenomena using the American Time Use Survey and time-diary data from France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Only small parts of the U.S.-European differences are due to observable characteristics. Adjusting for demographic and occupational differences, Americans{\textquoteright} incidence of night and weekend work would drop by no more than 10 percent if the average European workweek prevailed. Even if no Americans worked long hours, the incidence of unusual work times in the U.S. would far exceed those in continental Europe.",
author = "Daniel Hamermesh",
year = "2015",
month = oct,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0019793915592375",
language = "English",
volume = "68",
pages = "1007--1018",
journal = "Industrial and Labor Relations Review",
issn = "0019-7939",
publisher = "Cornell University",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long Workweeks and Strange Hours

AU - Hamermesh, Daniel

PY - 2015/10/1

Y1 - 2015/10/1

N2 - American workweeks are long compared to other rich countries’. Much less well-known is that Americans are more likely to work at night and on weekends. We examine the relationship between these two phenomena using the American Time Use Survey and time-diary data from France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Only small parts of the U.S.-European differences are due to observable characteristics. Adjusting for demographic and occupational differences, Americans’ incidence of night and weekend work would drop by no more than 10 percent if the average European workweek prevailed. Even if no Americans worked long hours, the incidence of unusual work times in the U.S. would far exceed those in continental Europe.

AB - American workweeks are long compared to other rich countries’. Much less well-known is that Americans are more likely to work at night and on weekends. We examine the relationship between these two phenomena using the American Time Use Survey and time-diary data from France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Only small parts of the U.S.-European differences are due to observable characteristics. Adjusting for demographic and occupational differences, Americans’ incidence of night and weekend work would drop by no more than 10 percent if the average European workweek prevailed. Even if no Americans worked long hours, the incidence of unusual work times in the U.S. would far exceed those in continental Europe.

U2 - 10.1177/0019793915592375

DO - 10.1177/0019793915592375

M3 - Article

VL - 68

SP - 1007

EP - 1018

JO - Industrial and Labor Relations Review

JF - Industrial and Labor Relations Review

SN - 0019-7939

IS - 5

ER -