Improvisation in Dance and the Movement of Everyday Life. / Worth, Libby.

The Oxford Handbook of Improvisation in Dance. ed. / Vida L Midgelow. 1st. ed. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2019. p. 1-13.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Published

Standard

Improvisation in Dance and the Movement of Everyday Life. / Worth, Libby.

The Oxford Handbook of Improvisation in Dance. ed. / Vida L Midgelow. 1st. ed. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2019. p. 1-13.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Harvard

Worth, L 2019, Improvisation in Dance and the Movement of Everyday Life. in VL Midgelow (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Improvisation in Dance. 1st edn, Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199396986.013.28

APA

Worth, L. (2019). Improvisation in Dance and the Movement of Everyday Life. In V. L. Midgelow (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Improvisation in Dance (1st ed., pp. 1-13). Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199396986.013.28

Vancouver

Worth L. Improvisation in Dance and the Movement of Everyday Life. In Midgelow VL, editor, The Oxford Handbook of Improvisation in Dance. 1st ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2019. p. 1-13 https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199396986.013.28

Author

Worth, Libby. / Improvisation in Dance and the Movement of Everyday Life. The Oxford Handbook of Improvisation in Dance. editor / Vida L Midgelow. 1st. ed. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2019. pp. 1-13

BibTeX

@inbook{c97578f43db648be9b01b6ebed05492f,
title = "Improvisation in Dance and the Movement of Everyday Life",
abstract = "Dance improvisation, as developed in the UK and the US in particular, has become associated with a number of tropes that apparently offer means of best practice. By attending to a few of these, I examine how they might offer insight into dance improvisation. This incorporates research into ways in which improvisation is a part of everyday life, as demonstrated most clearly in examples of infant movement and cognitive development. Taking Henry Montes and Marcus Coates{\textquoteright}s dance film A Question of Movement as a case study example, I consider how their innovative way of dancing responses to life questions connects with the infant{\textquoteright}s reliance on {\textquoteleft}thinking in movement{\textquoteright}, a term offered by Maxine Sheets-Johnstone. Finally, I consider what dancers can learn from people living with chronic dementia-related diseases who forge ways to live in a perpetual present and, conversely, what insight dancers might offer through integration of dance improvisatory processes in caregiving.",
keywords = "Improvisation, everyday movement, thinking in movement, infant development, dementia, life, dance,",
author = "Libby Worth",
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language = "English",
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RIS

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N2 - Dance improvisation, as developed in the UK and the US in particular, has become associated with a number of tropes that apparently offer means of best practice. By attending to a few of these, I examine how they might offer insight into dance improvisation. This incorporates research into ways in which improvisation is a part of everyday life, as demonstrated most clearly in examples of infant movement and cognitive development. Taking Henry Montes and Marcus Coates’s dance film A Question of Movement as a case study example, I consider how their innovative way of dancing responses to life questions connects with the infant’s reliance on ‘thinking in movement’, a term offered by Maxine Sheets-Johnstone. Finally, I consider what dancers can learn from people living with chronic dementia-related diseases who forge ways to live in a perpetual present and, conversely, what insight dancers might offer through integration of dance improvisatory processes in caregiving.

AB - Dance improvisation, as developed in the UK and the US in particular, has become associated with a number of tropes that apparently offer means of best practice. By attending to a few of these, I examine how they might offer insight into dance improvisation. This incorporates research into ways in which improvisation is a part of everyday life, as demonstrated most clearly in examples of infant movement and cognitive development. Taking Henry Montes and Marcus Coates’s dance film A Question of Movement as a case study example, I consider how their innovative way of dancing responses to life questions connects with the infant’s reliance on ‘thinking in movement’, a term offered by Maxine Sheets-Johnstone. Finally, I consider what dancers can learn from people living with chronic dementia-related diseases who forge ways to live in a perpetual present and, conversely, what insight dancers might offer through integration of dance improvisatory processes in caregiving.

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