‘I'm Still Not Crossing That’: Borders, Dispossession, and Sovereignty in Frozen River (2008). / Dodds, Klaus.

In: Geopolitics, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.10.2013, p. 560-583.

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‘I'm Still Not Crossing That’: Borders, Dispossession, and Sovereignty in Frozen River (2008). / Dodds, Klaus.

In: Geopolitics, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.10.2013, p. 560-583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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@article{e0ad0cb1a47c4f74a5b84a6d2193be6b,
title = "{\textquoteleft}I'm Still Not Crossing That{\textquoteright}: Borders, Dispossession, and Sovereignty in Frozen River (2008)",
abstract = "This paper considers the critically acclaimed debut film of Courtney Hunt entitled Frozen River (2008). Unlike many previous Hollywood 'border films', the focus of the film is on a frozen tributary of the St Lawrence and a border town in New York State and a Mohawk Indian reservation. By following the lives of two women, the paper reflects on how the film addresses multiple borders, sites of dispossession and a series of sovereign spaces along and across the frozen river. In a dramatic and compelling fashion, the narrative arc of the film serves as a powerful reminder of how security and insecurity and made and re-made in everyday life. Political geographers and border scholars could learn a great deal from examining closely the craft of the film maker. ",
keywords = "geopolitics, borders, sovereignty, security, dispossession",
author = "Klaus Dodds",
year = "2013",
month = oct,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/14650045.2012.749243",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "560--583",
journal = "Geopolitics",
issn = "1465-0045",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - ‘I'm Still Not Crossing That’: Borders, Dispossession, and Sovereignty in Frozen River (2008)

AU - Dodds, Klaus

PY - 2013/10/1

Y1 - 2013/10/1

N2 - This paper considers the critically acclaimed debut film of Courtney Hunt entitled Frozen River (2008). Unlike many previous Hollywood 'border films', the focus of the film is on a frozen tributary of the St Lawrence and a border town in New York State and a Mohawk Indian reservation. By following the lives of two women, the paper reflects on how the film addresses multiple borders, sites of dispossession and a series of sovereign spaces along and across the frozen river. In a dramatic and compelling fashion, the narrative arc of the film serves as a powerful reminder of how security and insecurity and made and re-made in everyday life. Political geographers and border scholars could learn a great deal from examining closely the craft of the film maker.

AB - This paper considers the critically acclaimed debut film of Courtney Hunt entitled Frozen River (2008). Unlike many previous Hollywood 'border films', the focus of the film is on a frozen tributary of the St Lawrence and a border town in New York State and a Mohawk Indian reservation. By following the lives of two women, the paper reflects on how the film addresses multiple borders, sites of dispossession and a series of sovereign spaces along and across the frozen river. In a dramatic and compelling fashion, the narrative arc of the film serves as a powerful reminder of how security and insecurity and made and re-made in everyday life. Political geographers and border scholars could learn a great deal from examining closely the craft of the film maker.

KW - geopolitics

KW - borders

KW - sovereignty

KW - security

KW - dispossession

U2 - 10.1080/14650045.2012.749243

DO - 10.1080/14650045.2012.749243

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 560

EP - 583

JO - Geopolitics

JF - Geopolitics

SN - 1465-0045

IS - 3

ER -