History, gendered space and organizational identity : An archival study of a university building. / Liu, Yihan; Grey, Christopher.

In: Human Relations, Vol. 71, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 640-667.

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History, gendered space and organizational identity : An archival study of a university building. / Liu, Yihan; Grey, Christopher.

In: Human Relations, Vol. 71, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 640-667.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{3fd705940e034206b4ae927dc6d85d93,
title = "History, gendered space and organizational identity: An archival study of a university building",
abstract = "How do buildings contribute to an organization’s sense of what it is? In this article, we present the findings of a major archival study of an iconic university building to answer this question. Founded in the 19th century as a college for women, the building is analysed as a gendered space that embodies meanings that are selectively deployed and adapted by the present-day, now co-educational, university. By bringing together concepts of space and history so as to examine ‘space in history’ we show how over long periods of time what buildings ‘say’ about an organization change so that the past is both a legacy and a resource for shifting organizational identity.",
author = "Yihan Liu and Christopher Grey",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0018726717733032",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "640--667",
journal = "Human Relations",
issn = "0018-7267",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - History, gendered space and organizational identity

T2 - An archival study of a university building

AU - Liu, Yihan

AU - Grey, Christopher

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - How do buildings contribute to an organization’s sense of what it is? In this article, we present the findings of a major archival study of an iconic university building to answer this question. Founded in the 19th century as a college for women, the building is analysed as a gendered space that embodies meanings that are selectively deployed and adapted by the present-day, now co-educational, university. By bringing together concepts of space and history so as to examine ‘space in history’ we show how over long periods of time what buildings ‘say’ about an organization change so that the past is both a legacy and a resource for shifting organizational identity.

AB - How do buildings contribute to an organization’s sense of what it is? In this article, we present the findings of a major archival study of an iconic university building to answer this question. Founded in the 19th century as a college for women, the building is analysed as a gendered space that embodies meanings that are selectively deployed and adapted by the present-day, now co-educational, university. By bringing together concepts of space and history so as to examine ‘space in history’ we show how over long periods of time what buildings ‘say’ about an organization change so that the past is both a legacy and a resource for shifting organizational identity.

U2 - 10.1177/0018726717733032

DO - 10.1177/0018726717733032

M3 - Article

VL - 71

SP - 640

EP - 667

JO - Human Relations

JF - Human Relations

SN - 0018-7267

IS - 5

ER -