Heritable influences on behavioral problems from early childhood to mid-adolescence: Evidence for genetic stability and innovation. / Lewis, Gary; Plomin, Robert.

In: Psychological Medicine, Vol. 45, No. 10, 01.07.2015, p. 2171-2179.

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Heritable influences on behavioral problems from early childhood to mid-adolescence: Evidence for genetic stability and innovation. / Lewis, Gary; Plomin, Robert.

In: Psychological Medicine, Vol. 45, No. 10, 01.07.2015, p. 2171-2179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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@article{c5cba8a65f214b58a5ed6bc7c4d2a2d7,
title = "Heritable influences on behavioral problems from early childhood to mid-adolescence: Evidence for genetic stability and innovation",
abstract = "Background Although behavioural problems (e.g. anxiety, conduct, hyperactivity, peer problems) are known to be heritable both in early childhood and in adolescence, limited work has examined prediction across these ages, and none using a genetically informative sample. Method We examined, first, whether parental ratings of behavioural problems (indexed by the Strengths and Difficulties questionnaire) at ages 4, 7, 9, 12, and 16 years were stable across these ages. Second, we examined the extent to which stability reflected genetic or environmental effects through multivariate quantitative genetic analysis on data from a large (n > 3000) population (UK) sample of monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Results Behavioural problems in early childhood (age 4 years) showed significant associations with the corresponding behavioural problem at all subsequent ages. Moreover, stable genetic influences were observed across ages, indicating that biological bases underlying behavioural problems in adolescence are underpinned by genetic influences expressed as early as age 4 years. However, genetic and environmental innovations were also observed at each age. Conclusion These observations indicate that genetic factors are important for understanding stable individual differences in behavioural problems across childhood and adolescence, although novel genetic influences also facilitate change in such behaviours.",
author = "Gary Lewis and Robert Plomin",
year = "2015",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S0033291715000173",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "2171--2179",
journal = "Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0033-2917",
publisher = "CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heritable influences on behavioral problems from early childhood to mid-adolescence: Evidence for genetic stability and innovation

AU - Lewis, Gary

AU - Plomin, Robert

PY - 2015/7/1

Y1 - 2015/7/1

N2 - Background Although behavioural problems (e.g. anxiety, conduct, hyperactivity, peer problems) are known to be heritable both in early childhood and in adolescence, limited work has examined prediction across these ages, and none using a genetically informative sample. Method We examined, first, whether parental ratings of behavioural problems (indexed by the Strengths and Difficulties questionnaire) at ages 4, 7, 9, 12, and 16 years were stable across these ages. Second, we examined the extent to which stability reflected genetic or environmental effects through multivariate quantitative genetic analysis on data from a large (n > 3000) population (UK) sample of monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Results Behavioural problems in early childhood (age 4 years) showed significant associations with the corresponding behavioural problem at all subsequent ages. Moreover, stable genetic influences were observed across ages, indicating that biological bases underlying behavioural problems in adolescence are underpinned by genetic influences expressed as early as age 4 years. However, genetic and environmental innovations were also observed at each age. Conclusion These observations indicate that genetic factors are important for understanding stable individual differences in behavioural problems across childhood and adolescence, although novel genetic influences also facilitate change in such behaviours.

AB - Background Although behavioural problems (e.g. anxiety, conduct, hyperactivity, peer problems) are known to be heritable both in early childhood and in adolescence, limited work has examined prediction across these ages, and none using a genetically informative sample. Method We examined, first, whether parental ratings of behavioural problems (indexed by the Strengths and Difficulties questionnaire) at ages 4, 7, 9, 12, and 16 years were stable across these ages. Second, we examined the extent to which stability reflected genetic or environmental effects through multivariate quantitative genetic analysis on data from a large (n > 3000) population (UK) sample of monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Results Behavioural problems in early childhood (age 4 years) showed significant associations with the corresponding behavioural problem at all subsequent ages. Moreover, stable genetic influences were observed across ages, indicating that biological bases underlying behavioural problems in adolescence are underpinned by genetic influences expressed as early as age 4 years. However, genetic and environmental innovations were also observed at each age. Conclusion These observations indicate that genetic factors are important for understanding stable individual differences in behavioural problems across childhood and adolescence, although novel genetic influences also facilitate change in such behaviours.

U2 - 10.1017/S0033291715000173

DO - 10.1017/S0033291715000173

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 2171

EP - 2179

JO - Psychological Medicine

JF - Psychological Medicine

SN - 0033-2917

IS - 10

ER -