Gendered Security Harms : State Policy and the Counterinsurgency Against Boko Haram. / Pearson, Elizabeth; Nagarajan, Chitra.

In: African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review, Vol. 10, No. 2, 12.01.2021, p. 108-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Gendered Security Harms : State Policy and the Counterinsurgency Against Boko Haram. / Pearson, Elizabeth; Nagarajan, Chitra.

In: African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review, Vol. 10, No. 2, 12.01.2021, p. 108-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Pearson, E & Nagarajan, C 2021, 'Gendered Security Harms: State Policy and the Counterinsurgency Against Boko Haram', African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 108-140. <https://muse.jhu.edu/article/778287>

APA

Pearson, E., & Nagarajan, C. (2021). Gendered Security Harms: State Policy and the Counterinsurgency Against Boko Haram. African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review, 10(2), 108-140. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/778287

Vancouver

Pearson E, Nagarajan C. Gendered Security Harms: State Policy and the Counterinsurgency Against Boko Haram. African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review. 2021 Jan 12;10(2):108-140.

Author

Pearson, Elizabeth ; Nagarajan, Chitra. / Gendered Security Harms : State Policy and the Counterinsurgency Against Boko Haram. In: African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review. 2021 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 108-140.

BibTeX

@article{89be7fae8b9445b6b1f57bff8336cbdd,
title = "Gendered Security Harms: State Policy and the Counterinsurgency Against Boko Haram",
abstract = "Scholars have critiqued the incorporation of gender into counter-terrorism and countering violent extremism: programmes have instrumentalised the Women Peace and Security (WPS) agenda towards state-centric goals and essentialised the women (and men) they encounter. Furthermore, as Huckerby outlines, the explicit inclusion of gender in security policy can produce specific gendered security harms: coercive and non-coercive practices; securitization of women{\textquoteright}s rights; and lack of attention to the gendered effects of seemingly gender-neutral policy. This article engages Huckerby{\textquoteright}s typology to explore the gendered security harms produced in Nigeria{\textquoteright}s counter-insurgency against {\textquoteleft}Boko Haram{\textquoteright}. It suggests first that a simplistic approach to women, not gendered power relations, leaves Nigeria unable to respond to the complex gendered dynamics of jihadist actors in the northeast. Second, a neglect of human rights and the role of state actors in abuses actively enable gendered security harms. The article concludes that Nigeria is therefore still failing to protect women.",
author = "Elizabeth Pearson and Chitra Nagarajan",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
day = "12",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "108--140",
journal = "African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review",
issn = "2156-7263",
publisher = "Indiana University Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gendered Security Harms

T2 - State Policy and the Counterinsurgency Against Boko Haram

AU - Pearson, Elizabeth

AU - Nagarajan, Chitra

PY - 2021/1/12

Y1 - 2021/1/12

N2 - Scholars have critiqued the incorporation of gender into counter-terrorism and countering violent extremism: programmes have instrumentalised the Women Peace and Security (WPS) agenda towards state-centric goals and essentialised the women (and men) they encounter. Furthermore, as Huckerby outlines, the explicit inclusion of gender in security policy can produce specific gendered security harms: coercive and non-coercive practices; securitization of women’s rights; and lack of attention to the gendered effects of seemingly gender-neutral policy. This article engages Huckerby’s typology to explore the gendered security harms produced in Nigeria’s counter-insurgency against ‘Boko Haram’. It suggests first that a simplistic approach to women, not gendered power relations, leaves Nigeria unable to respond to the complex gendered dynamics of jihadist actors in the northeast. Second, a neglect of human rights and the role of state actors in abuses actively enable gendered security harms. The article concludes that Nigeria is therefore still failing to protect women.

AB - Scholars have critiqued the incorporation of gender into counter-terrorism and countering violent extremism: programmes have instrumentalised the Women Peace and Security (WPS) agenda towards state-centric goals and essentialised the women (and men) they encounter. Furthermore, as Huckerby outlines, the explicit inclusion of gender in security policy can produce specific gendered security harms: coercive and non-coercive practices; securitization of women’s rights; and lack of attention to the gendered effects of seemingly gender-neutral policy. This article engages Huckerby’s typology to explore the gendered security harms produced in Nigeria’s counter-insurgency against ‘Boko Haram’. It suggests first that a simplistic approach to women, not gendered power relations, leaves Nigeria unable to respond to the complex gendered dynamics of jihadist actors in the northeast. Second, a neglect of human rights and the role of state actors in abuses actively enable gendered security harms. The article concludes that Nigeria is therefore still failing to protect women.

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 108

EP - 140

JO - African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review

JF - African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review

SN - 2156-7263

IS - 2

ER -