From independence to independents, public service to profit : British TV and the Impossibility of Independence. / Bennett, James.

Media Independence: Working with freedom or working for free?. ed. / Jams Bennett; Niki Strange. New York : Routledge, 2015. p. 71-94.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Published

Standard

From independence to independents, public service to profit : British TV and the Impossibility of Independence. / Bennett, James.

Media Independence: Working with freedom or working for free?. ed. / Jams Bennett; Niki Strange. New York : Routledge, 2015. p. 71-94.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Harvard

Bennett, J 2015, From independence to independents, public service to profit: British TV and the Impossibility of Independence. in J Bennett & N Strange (eds), Media Independence: Working with freedom or working for free?. Routledge, New York, pp. 71-94.

APA

Bennett, J. (2015). From independence to independents, public service to profit: British TV and the Impossibility of Independence. In J. Bennett, & N. Strange (Eds.), Media Independence: Working with freedom or working for free? (pp. 71-94). Routledge.

Vancouver

Bennett J. From independence to independents, public service to profit: British TV and the Impossibility of Independence. In Bennett J, Strange N, editors, Media Independence: Working with freedom or working for free?. New York: Routledge. 2015. p. 71-94

Author

Bennett, James. / From independence to independents, public service to profit : British TV and the Impossibility of Independence. Media Independence: Working with freedom or working for free?. editor / Jams Bennett ; Niki Strange. New York : Routledge, 2015. pp. 71-94

BibTeX

@inbook{3dcd61e30c424415916208e8dc2c5a10,
title = "From independence to independents, public service to profit: British TV and the Impossibility of Independence",
abstract = "… it{\textquoteright}s a brutal, horrible business. The media and creativity in general are impossible. I mean TV independence is impossible and factual TV independence is impossible. I mean they{\textquoteright}re all impossible. —CEO of UK {\textquoteleft}Indie{\textquoteright} TV company (Interview 40, 12/5/2011).This chapter examines the central role independence has played in the structure of UK television, since the inception of broadcasting with the BBC through to the emergence and growth of the independent production sector. The chapter argues that there has been an elision between the independence—as an ideal providing creative freedom from commercial and governmental pressures—and independents—the profit-driven sector that now produces much of UK content. Independence, I argue, emerges as a key site tension in the UK television industry between public service and profit, editorial freedom and risk, and the conditions of labor that result. Drawing on interviews with a range of workers within 30 independent television production companies, as well as commissioners at the BBC and Channel 4, this chapter looks at how the production cultures of Indies themselves try to understand and resolve this tension. Across these interviews, two key discourses emerged in interviewees{\textquoteright} explanation of this public service-commercial tension: “quality” and creating programming that “makes a difference.” Thus in trying to resolve the “impossibility” of independence, the CEO quoted above, explained “we just try and make good stuff.” This chapter asks to what extent “independence” can ever truly be achieved in the context of making high quality public service content that “makes a difference,” at the same time as delivering profit. As the pressure for profit increasingly squeeze production budgets and working conditions, we look at what independent public service production means for those involved in this “impossible” business. ",
keywords = "Television, Independent media, BBC, public service broadcasting, production cultures",
author = "James Bennett",
year = "2015",
month = jan,
language = "English",
isbn = "978-1-13-802348-2",
pages = "71--94",
editor = "Jams Bennett and Niki Strange",
booktitle = "Media Independence",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - From independence to independents, public service to profit

T2 - British TV and the Impossibility of Independence

AU - Bennett, James

PY - 2015/1

Y1 - 2015/1

N2 - … it’s a brutal, horrible business. The media and creativity in general are impossible. I mean TV independence is impossible and factual TV independence is impossible. I mean they’re all impossible. —CEO of UK ‘Indie’ TV company (Interview 40, 12/5/2011).This chapter examines the central role independence has played in the structure of UK television, since the inception of broadcasting with the BBC through to the emergence and growth of the independent production sector. The chapter argues that there has been an elision between the independence—as an ideal providing creative freedom from commercial and governmental pressures—and independents—the profit-driven sector that now produces much of UK content. Independence, I argue, emerges as a key site tension in the UK television industry between public service and profit, editorial freedom and risk, and the conditions of labor that result. Drawing on interviews with a range of workers within 30 independent television production companies, as well as commissioners at the BBC and Channel 4, this chapter looks at how the production cultures of Indies themselves try to understand and resolve this tension. Across these interviews, two key discourses emerged in interviewees’ explanation of this public service-commercial tension: “quality” and creating programming that “makes a difference.” Thus in trying to resolve the “impossibility” of independence, the CEO quoted above, explained “we just try and make good stuff.” This chapter asks to what extent “independence” can ever truly be achieved in the context of making high quality public service content that “makes a difference,” at the same time as delivering profit. As the pressure for profit increasingly squeeze production budgets and working conditions, we look at what independent public service production means for those involved in this “impossible” business.

AB - … it’s a brutal, horrible business. The media and creativity in general are impossible. I mean TV independence is impossible and factual TV independence is impossible. I mean they’re all impossible. —CEO of UK ‘Indie’ TV company (Interview 40, 12/5/2011).This chapter examines the central role independence has played in the structure of UK television, since the inception of broadcasting with the BBC through to the emergence and growth of the independent production sector. The chapter argues that there has been an elision between the independence—as an ideal providing creative freedom from commercial and governmental pressures—and independents—the profit-driven sector that now produces much of UK content. Independence, I argue, emerges as a key site tension in the UK television industry between public service and profit, editorial freedom and risk, and the conditions of labor that result. Drawing on interviews with a range of workers within 30 independent television production companies, as well as commissioners at the BBC and Channel 4, this chapter looks at how the production cultures of Indies themselves try to understand and resolve this tension. Across these interviews, two key discourses emerged in interviewees’ explanation of this public service-commercial tension: “quality” and creating programming that “makes a difference.” Thus in trying to resolve the “impossibility” of independence, the CEO quoted above, explained “we just try and make good stuff.” This chapter asks to what extent “independence” can ever truly be achieved in the context of making high quality public service content that “makes a difference,” at the same time as delivering profit. As the pressure for profit increasingly squeeze production budgets and working conditions, we look at what independent public service production means for those involved in this “impossible” business.

KW - Television

KW - Independent media

KW - BBC

KW - public service broadcasting

KW - production cultures

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978-1-13-802348-2

SP - 71

EP - 94

BT - Media Independence

A2 - Bennett, Jams

A2 - Strange, Niki

PB - Routledge

CY - New York

ER -