Franchising as a Strategy for Combining Small and Large Group Advantages (Logics) in Social Entrepreneurship : A Hayekian Perspective. / Beckmann, Markus; Zeyen, Anica.

In: Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Vol. 43, No. 3, 01.06.2014, p. 502-522.

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Franchising as a Strategy for Combining Small and Large Group Advantages (Logics) in Social Entrepreneurship : A Hayekian Perspective. / Beckmann, Markus; Zeyen, Anica.

In: Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Vol. 43, No. 3, 01.06.2014, p. 502-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Beckmann, Markus ; Zeyen, Anica. / Franchising as a Strategy for Combining Small and Large Group Advantages (Logics) in Social Entrepreneurship : A Hayekian Perspective. In: Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly. 2014 ; Vol. 43, No. 3. pp. 502-522.

BibTeX

@article{c0c66fb0788b4333beab8355da2d3c6c,
title = "Franchising as a Strategy for Combining Small and Large Group Advantages (Logics) in Social Entrepreneurship: A Hayekian Perspective",
abstract = "This article develops a Hayekian perspective on social franchising that distinguishes between the end-connected logic of the small group and the rule-connected logic of the big group. Our key claim is that mission-driven social entrepreneurs often draw on the small-group logic when starting their social ventures and then face difficulties when the process of scaling shifts their operations toward a big-group logic. In this situation, social franchising offers a strategy to replicate the small group despite systemwide scaling, to mobilize decentrally accessible social capital, and to reduce agency costs through mechanisms of self-selection and self-monitoring. By employing a Hayekian perspective, we are thus able to offer an explanation as to why social franchising is a suitable scaling strategy for some social entrepreneurship organizations and not for others. We illustrate our work using the Ashoka Fellow Wellcome. ",
keywords = "Social franchising, social entrepreneurship, Hayek",
author = "Markus Beckmann and Anica Zeyen",
year = "2014",
month = jun,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0899764012470758",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "502--522",
journal = "Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly",
issn = "0899-7640",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Franchising as a Strategy for Combining Small and Large Group Advantages (Logics) in Social Entrepreneurship

T2 - A Hayekian Perspective

AU - Beckmann, Markus

AU - Zeyen, Anica

PY - 2014/6/1

Y1 - 2014/6/1

N2 - This article develops a Hayekian perspective on social franchising that distinguishes between the end-connected logic of the small group and the rule-connected logic of the big group. Our key claim is that mission-driven social entrepreneurs often draw on the small-group logic when starting their social ventures and then face difficulties when the process of scaling shifts their operations toward a big-group logic. In this situation, social franchising offers a strategy to replicate the small group despite systemwide scaling, to mobilize decentrally accessible social capital, and to reduce agency costs through mechanisms of self-selection and self-monitoring. By employing a Hayekian perspective, we are thus able to offer an explanation as to why social franchising is a suitable scaling strategy for some social entrepreneurship organizations and not for others. We illustrate our work using the Ashoka Fellow Wellcome.

AB - This article develops a Hayekian perspective on social franchising that distinguishes between the end-connected logic of the small group and the rule-connected logic of the big group. Our key claim is that mission-driven social entrepreneurs often draw on the small-group logic when starting their social ventures and then face difficulties when the process of scaling shifts their operations toward a big-group logic. In this situation, social franchising offers a strategy to replicate the small group despite systemwide scaling, to mobilize decentrally accessible social capital, and to reduce agency costs through mechanisms of self-selection and self-monitoring. By employing a Hayekian perspective, we are thus able to offer an explanation as to why social franchising is a suitable scaling strategy for some social entrepreneurship organizations and not for others. We illustrate our work using the Ashoka Fellow Wellcome.

KW - Social franchising

KW - social entrepreneurship

KW - Hayek

U2 - 10.1177/0899764012470758

DO - 10.1177/0899764012470758

M3 - Article

VL - 43

SP - 502

EP - 522

JO - Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly

JF - Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly

SN - 0899-7640

IS - 3

ER -