Fissure. / Dodds, Klaus-John.

In: Cultural Anthropology, Vol. 32, 24.10.2017, p. 1-2.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

Published

Standard

Fissure. / Dodds, Klaus-John.

In: Cultural Anthropology, Vol. 32, 24.10.2017, p. 1-2.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

Harvard

Dodds, K-J 2017, 'Fissure', Cultural Anthropology, vol. 32, pp. 1-2. <https://culanth.org/fieldsights/fissure>

APA

Dodds, K-J. (2017). Fissure. Cultural Anthropology, 32, 1-2. https://culanth.org/fieldsights/fissure

Vancouver

Dodds K-J. Fissure. Cultural Anthropology. 2017 Oct 24;32:1-2.

Author

Dodds, Klaus-John. / Fissure. In: Cultural Anthropology. 2017 ; Vol. 32. pp. 1-2.

BibTeX

@article{a4fc2977b3da47fbb69ebe7de0d24797,
title = "Fissure",
abstract = "The fissure strikes me as an apt analytic for recent thinking around the volumetric turn in geopolitics and the more-than-human qualities of territory and terrain (see Elden 2013). A fissured ontology would highlight space as inherently dynamic, state-shifting, pressured, fractured. When fissures make their way through ice, for instance, the subterranean, surface, and air are made copresent: cracks allow surface water to penetrate below while the exposure of ice to air facilitates new formations such as snow bridges and large columns of glacial ice, which are created by the intersection of crevasses. The ongoing interaction between ice, water, and air ensures that the ice beneath a glacier or ice sheet is never fixed.",
keywords = "Fissure, Ice , Geopolitics, Territory , Volume , Elemental ",
author = "Klaus-John Dodds",
year = "2017",
month = oct,
day = "24",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "1--2",
journal = "Cultural Anthropology",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fissure

AU - Dodds, Klaus-John

PY - 2017/10/24

Y1 - 2017/10/24

N2 - The fissure strikes me as an apt analytic for recent thinking around the volumetric turn in geopolitics and the more-than-human qualities of territory and terrain (see Elden 2013). A fissured ontology would highlight space as inherently dynamic, state-shifting, pressured, fractured. When fissures make their way through ice, for instance, the subterranean, surface, and air are made copresent: cracks allow surface water to penetrate below while the exposure of ice to air facilitates new formations such as snow bridges and large columns of glacial ice, which are created by the intersection of crevasses. The ongoing interaction between ice, water, and air ensures that the ice beneath a glacier or ice sheet is never fixed.

AB - The fissure strikes me as an apt analytic for recent thinking around the volumetric turn in geopolitics and the more-than-human qualities of territory and terrain (see Elden 2013). A fissured ontology would highlight space as inherently dynamic, state-shifting, pressured, fractured. When fissures make their way through ice, for instance, the subterranean, surface, and air are made copresent: cracks allow surface water to penetrate below while the exposure of ice to air facilitates new formations such as snow bridges and large columns of glacial ice, which are created by the intersection of crevasses. The ongoing interaction between ice, water, and air ensures that the ice beneath a glacier or ice sheet is never fixed.

KW - Fissure

KW - Ice

KW - Geopolitics

KW - Territory

KW - Volume

KW - Elemental

M3 - Editorial

VL - 32

SP - 1

EP - 2

JO - Cultural Anthropology

JF - Cultural Anthropology

ER -