Finding Myself, Lost. / Mccutcheon, Rebecca.

2016. Paper presented at Audience, Experience, Desire Conference, Exeter, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Unpublished

Standard

Finding Myself, Lost. / Mccutcheon, Rebecca.

2016. Paper presented at Audience, Experience, Desire Conference, Exeter, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Harvard

Mccutcheon, R 2016, 'Finding Myself, Lost', Paper presented at Audience, Experience, Desire Conference, Exeter, United Kingdom, 29/01/16 - 30/01/16.

APA

Mccutcheon, R. (2016). Finding Myself, Lost. Paper presented at Audience, Experience, Desire Conference, Exeter, United Kingdom.

Vancouver

Mccutcheon R. Finding Myself, Lost. 2016. Paper presented at Audience, Experience, Desire Conference, Exeter, United Kingdom.

Author

Mccutcheon, Rebecca. / Finding Myself, Lost. Paper presented at Audience, Experience, Desire Conference, Exeter, United Kingdom.

BibTeX

@conference{3f5f8ccfc5e14551b6d6130899b5ac64,
title = "Finding Myself, Lost",
abstract = "The experience of disorientation, and of {\textquoteleft}out of place{\textquoteright}-ness is frequently a component of participation in both site-specific and immersive theatre performances. It is often cited as a central part of the thrill or pleasure of participation. Encountering unexpected, or even dysfunctional place-behaviours, participants are caught in situations in which the day-to-day rules of life are suspended. Engagement with these performances are highly memorable, and when articulated by audiences, reflections tend to focus on the intensity of affective, non-verbal encounters. Drawing on my practice-based research exploring notions of place-identity drawn from environmental psychology, I propose that through encountering what has been termed {\textquoteleft}dysfunctional place{\textquoteright}, (Proshansky et al, Genereaux et al) the sense of place-identity for the participant is challenged, a moment which offers the possibility of a subtle shift in self-identity. If this is the case, the effusive response of audiences is not {\textquoteleft}merely{\textquoteright} hedonism, but a response to a significant, possibly even transformative encounter. For makers, this moment of lostness contains great potential – for affirmative, progressive engagement, and of immense cultural value. ",
author = "Rebecca Mccutcheon",
year = "2016",
month = jan,
day = "29",
language = "English",
note = "Audience, Experience, Desire Conference ; Conference date: 29-01-2016 Through 30-01-2016",

}

RIS

TY - CONF

T1 - Finding Myself, Lost

AU - Mccutcheon, Rebecca

PY - 2016/1/29

Y1 - 2016/1/29

N2 - The experience of disorientation, and of ‘out of place’-ness is frequently a component of participation in both site-specific and immersive theatre performances. It is often cited as a central part of the thrill or pleasure of participation. Encountering unexpected, or even dysfunctional place-behaviours, participants are caught in situations in which the day-to-day rules of life are suspended. Engagement with these performances are highly memorable, and when articulated by audiences, reflections tend to focus on the intensity of affective, non-verbal encounters. Drawing on my practice-based research exploring notions of place-identity drawn from environmental psychology, I propose that through encountering what has been termed ‘dysfunctional place’, (Proshansky et al, Genereaux et al) the sense of place-identity for the participant is challenged, a moment which offers the possibility of a subtle shift in self-identity. If this is the case, the effusive response of audiences is not ‘merely’ hedonism, but a response to a significant, possibly even transformative encounter. For makers, this moment of lostness contains great potential – for affirmative, progressive engagement, and of immense cultural value.

AB - The experience of disorientation, and of ‘out of place’-ness is frequently a component of participation in both site-specific and immersive theatre performances. It is often cited as a central part of the thrill or pleasure of participation. Encountering unexpected, or even dysfunctional place-behaviours, participants are caught in situations in which the day-to-day rules of life are suspended. Engagement with these performances are highly memorable, and when articulated by audiences, reflections tend to focus on the intensity of affective, non-verbal encounters. Drawing on my practice-based research exploring notions of place-identity drawn from environmental psychology, I propose that through encountering what has been termed ‘dysfunctional place’, (Proshansky et al, Genereaux et al) the sense of place-identity for the participant is challenged, a moment which offers the possibility of a subtle shift in self-identity. If this is the case, the effusive response of audiences is not ‘merely’ hedonism, but a response to a significant, possibly even transformative encounter. For makers, this moment of lostness contains great potential – for affirmative, progressive engagement, and of immense cultural value.

M3 - Paper

T2 - Audience, Experience, Desire Conference

Y2 - 29 January 2016 through 30 January 2016

ER -