Explaining delusional beliefs: A hybrid model. / Miyazono, Kengo; McKay, Ryan.

In: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, Vol. 24, No. 5, 2019, p. 335-346.

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Explaining delusional beliefs: A hybrid model. / Miyazono, Kengo; McKay, Ryan.

In: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, Vol. 24, No. 5, 2019, p. 335-346.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Miyazono, K & McKay, R 2019, 'Explaining delusional beliefs: A hybrid model', Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, vol. 24, no. 5, pp. 335-346. https://doi.org/10.1080/13546805.2019.1664443

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Miyazono, Kengo ; McKay, Ryan. / Explaining delusional beliefs: A hybrid model. In: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry. 2019 ; Vol. 24, No. 5. pp. 335-346.

BibTeX

@article{11461e5318dd41388ed600d5307fd0d2,
title = "Explaining delusional beliefs: A hybrid model",
abstract = "Introduction: In this paper we present and defend a hybrid theoryof the development of delusions that incorporates the centralideas of two influential (yet sometimes bitterly opposing)theoretical approaches to delusions—the two-factor theory andthe prediction error theory.Method: After introducing the central ideas of the two-factor theoryand the prediction error theory, we describe the motivations for ourconciliatory project, explain the theoretical details of the hybridtheory we propose, and answer potential objections to our proposal.Results: According to the hybrid theory we advance, the first factorof a delusion is physically grounded in an abnormal prediction error,and the second factor is physically grounded in the overestimationof the precision of the abnormal prediction error. Againstanticipated objections, we argue that the hybrid theory isinternally coherent, and that it constitutes a genuine hybridbetween the two-factor theory and the prediction error theory.Conclusion: A rapprochement between the two-factor theory andthe prediction error theory is both possible and desirable. Inparticular, our hybrid theory provides a parsimonious and unifiedaccount of delusions, whether monothematic or polythematic,across a wide variety of medical conditions.",
author = "Kengo Miyazono and Ryan McKay",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/13546805.2019.1664443",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "335--346",
journal = "Cognitive Neuropsychiatry",
issn = "1354-6805",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Explaining delusional beliefs: A hybrid model

AU - Miyazono, Kengo

AU - McKay, Ryan

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Introduction: In this paper we present and defend a hybrid theoryof the development of delusions that incorporates the centralideas of two influential (yet sometimes bitterly opposing)theoretical approaches to delusions—the two-factor theory andthe prediction error theory.Method: After introducing the central ideas of the two-factor theoryand the prediction error theory, we describe the motivations for ourconciliatory project, explain the theoretical details of the hybridtheory we propose, and answer potential objections to our proposal.Results: According to the hybrid theory we advance, the first factorof a delusion is physically grounded in an abnormal prediction error,and the second factor is physically grounded in the overestimationof the precision of the abnormal prediction error. Againstanticipated objections, we argue that the hybrid theory isinternally coherent, and that it constitutes a genuine hybridbetween the two-factor theory and the prediction error theory.Conclusion: A rapprochement between the two-factor theory andthe prediction error theory is both possible and desirable. Inparticular, our hybrid theory provides a parsimonious and unifiedaccount of delusions, whether monothematic or polythematic,across a wide variety of medical conditions.

AB - Introduction: In this paper we present and defend a hybrid theoryof the development of delusions that incorporates the centralideas of two influential (yet sometimes bitterly opposing)theoretical approaches to delusions—the two-factor theory andthe prediction error theory.Method: After introducing the central ideas of the two-factor theoryand the prediction error theory, we describe the motivations for ourconciliatory project, explain the theoretical details of the hybridtheory we propose, and answer potential objections to our proposal.Results: According to the hybrid theory we advance, the first factorof a delusion is physically grounded in an abnormal prediction error,and the second factor is physically grounded in the overestimationof the precision of the abnormal prediction error. Againstanticipated objections, we argue that the hybrid theory isinternally coherent, and that it constitutes a genuine hybridbetween the two-factor theory and the prediction error theory.Conclusion: A rapprochement between the two-factor theory andthe prediction error theory is both possible and desirable. Inparticular, our hybrid theory provides a parsimonious and unifiedaccount of delusions, whether monothematic or polythematic,across a wide variety of medical conditions.

U2 - 10.1080/13546805.2019.1664443

DO - 10.1080/13546805.2019.1664443

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 335

EP - 346

JO - Cognitive Neuropsychiatry

JF - Cognitive Neuropsychiatry

SN - 1354-6805

IS - 5

ER -