Exites in Cambrian arthropods and homology of arthropod limb branches. / Liu, Yu; Bond, Andrew.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 12, 4619, 30.07.2021.

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Exites in Cambrian arthropods and homology of arthropod limb branches. / Liu, Yu; Bond, Andrew.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 12, 4619, 30.07.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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@article{f889d9c847764909b56b6df1f47ff1f7,
title = "Exites in Cambrian arthropods and homology of arthropod limb branches",
abstract = "The last common ancestor of all living arthropods had biramous postantennal appendages, with an endopodite and exopodite branching off the limb base. Morphological evidence for homology of these rami between crustaceans and chelicerates has, however, been challenged by data from clonal composition and from knockout of leg patterning genes. Cambrian arthropod fossils have been cited as providing support for competing hypotheses about biramy but have shed little light on additional lateral outgrowths, known as exites. Here we draw on microtomographic imaging of the Cambrian great-appendage arthropod Leanchoilia to reveal a previously undetected exite at the base of most appendages, composed of overlapping lamellae. A morphologically similar, and we infer homologous, exite is docu- mented in the same position in members of the trilobite-allied Artiopoda. This early Cambrian exite morphology supplements an emerging picture from gene expression that exites may have a deeper origin in arthropod phylogeny than has been appreciated.",
author = "Yu Liu and Andrew Bond",
year = "2021",
month = jul,
day = "30",
doi = "10.1038/s41467-021-24918-8",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "Nature Communications",
issn = "2041-1723",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exites in Cambrian arthropods and homology of arthropod limb branches

AU - Liu, Yu

AU - Bond, Andrew

PY - 2021/7/30

Y1 - 2021/7/30

N2 - The last common ancestor of all living arthropods had biramous postantennal appendages, with an endopodite and exopodite branching off the limb base. Morphological evidence for homology of these rami between crustaceans and chelicerates has, however, been challenged by data from clonal composition and from knockout of leg patterning genes. Cambrian arthropod fossils have been cited as providing support for competing hypotheses about biramy but have shed little light on additional lateral outgrowths, known as exites. Here we draw on microtomographic imaging of the Cambrian great-appendage arthropod Leanchoilia to reveal a previously undetected exite at the base of most appendages, composed of overlapping lamellae. A morphologically similar, and we infer homologous, exite is docu- mented in the same position in members of the trilobite-allied Artiopoda. This early Cambrian exite morphology supplements an emerging picture from gene expression that exites may have a deeper origin in arthropod phylogeny than has been appreciated.

AB - The last common ancestor of all living arthropods had biramous postantennal appendages, with an endopodite and exopodite branching off the limb base. Morphological evidence for homology of these rami between crustaceans and chelicerates has, however, been challenged by data from clonal composition and from knockout of leg patterning genes. Cambrian arthropod fossils have been cited as providing support for competing hypotheses about biramy but have shed little light on additional lateral outgrowths, known as exites. Here we draw on microtomographic imaging of the Cambrian great-appendage arthropod Leanchoilia to reveal a previously undetected exite at the base of most appendages, composed of overlapping lamellae. A morphologically similar, and we infer homologous, exite is docu- mented in the same position in members of the trilobite-allied Artiopoda. This early Cambrian exite morphology supplements an emerging picture from gene expression that exites may have a deeper origin in arthropod phylogeny than has been appreciated.

U2 - 10.1038/s41467-021-24918-8

DO - 10.1038/s41467-021-24918-8

M3 - Article

VL - 12

JO - Nature Communications

JF - Nature Communications

SN - 2041-1723

M1 - 4619

ER -