Does labor legislation benefit workers? Well-being after an hours reduction. / Hamermesh, Daniel; Kawaguchi, Daiji; Lee, Jungmin`.

In: Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Vol. 44, 06.2017, p. 1–12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Does labor legislation benefit workers? Well-being after an hours reduction. / Hamermesh, Daniel; Kawaguchi, Daiji; Lee, Jungmin`.

In: Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Vol. 44, 06.2017, p. 1–12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Hamermesh, D, Kawaguchi, D & Lee, J 2017, 'Does labor legislation benefit workers? Well-being after an hours reduction', Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, vol. 44, pp. 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jjie.2017.02.003

APA

Hamermesh, D., Kawaguchi, D., & Lee, J. (2017). Does labor legislation benefit workers? Well-being after an hours reduction. Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, 44, 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jjie.2017.02.003

Vancouver

Hamermesh D, Kawaguchi D, Lee J. Does labor legislation benefit workers? Well-being after an hours reduction. Journal of the Japanese and International Economies. 2017 Jun;44:1–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jjie.2017.02.003

Author

Hamermesh, Daniel ; Kawaguchi, Daiji ; Lee, Jungmin`. / Does labor legislation benefit workers? Well-being after an hours reduction. In: Journal of the Japanese and International Economies. 2017 ; Vol. 44. pp. 1–12.

BibTeX

@article{022a9411a70e4dadba4d420fec2c3106,
title = "Does labor legislation benefit workers? Well-being after an hours reduction",
abstract = "Are workers in modern economies working “too hard”—would they be better off in an equilibrium with fewer work hours? We examine changes in life satisfaction of Japanese and Koreans over a period when hours of work were cut exogenously because employers suddenly faced an overtime penalty effective at lower standard hours. Using repeated cross sections we show that life satisfaction increased relatively among those workers most likely to have been affected by the legislation, with the same finding using Korean longitudinal data. In a household model estimated over the Korean cross-section data we find some evidence that a reduction in the husband's workhours increased his wife's well-being. These results are consistent with the claim that legislated reductions in work hours can increase workers{\textquoteright} utility.",
author = "Daniel Hamermesh and Daiji Kawaguchi and Jungmin` Lee",
year = "2017",
month = jun,
doi = "10.1016/j.jjie.2017.02.003",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "1–12",
journal = "Journal of the Japanese and International Economies",
issn = "0889-1583",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does labor legislation benefit workers? Well-being after an hours reduction

AU - Hamermesh, Daniel

AU - Kawaguchi, Daiji

AU - Lee, Jungmin`

PY - 2017/6

Y1 - 2017/6

N2 - Are workers in modern economies working “too hard”—would they be better off in an equilibrium with fewer work hours? We examine changes in life satisfaction of Japanese and Koreans over a period when hours of work were cut exogenously because employers suddenly faced an overtime penalty effective at lower standard hours. Using repeated cross sections we show that life satisfaction increased relatively among those workers most likely to have been affected by the legislation, with the same finding using Korean longitudinal data. In a household model estimated over the Korean cross-section data we find some evidence that a reduction in the husband's workhours increased his wife's well-being. These results are consistent with the claim that legislated reductions in work hours can increase workers’ utility.

AB - Are workers in modern economies working “too hard”—would they be better off in an equilibrium with fewer work hours? We examine changes in life satisfaction of Japanese and Koreans over a period when hours of work were cut exogenously because employers suddenly faced an overtime penalty effective at lower standard hours. Using repeated cross sections we show that life satisfaction increased relatively among those workers most likely to have been affected by the legislation, with the same finding using Korean longitudinal data. In a household model estimated over the Korean cross-section data we find some evidence that a reduction in the husband's workhours increased his wife's well-being. These results are consistent with the claim that legislated reductions in work hours can increase workers’ utility.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jjie.2017.02.003

DO - 10.1016/j.jjie.2017.02.003

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 1

EP - 12

JO - Journal of the Japanese and International Economies

JF - Journal of the Japanese and International Economies

SN - 0889-1583

ER -