Do direct-democratic procedures lead to higher acceptance than political representation? / Towfigh, Emanuel ; Goerg, Sebastian; Gloeckner, Andreas; Leifeld, Philip; Llorente-Sauger, Aniol; Bade, Sophie; Kurschilgen, Carlos.

In: Public Choice, Vol. 167, No. 1-2, 11.05.2016, p. 47–65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Do direct-democratic procedures lead to higher acceptance than political representation? / Towfigh, Emanuel ; Goerg, Sebastian; Gloeckner, Andreas; Leifeld, Philip; Llorente-Sauger, Aniol; Bade, Sophie; Kurschilgen, Carlos.

In: Public Choice, Vol. 167, No. 1-2, 11.05.2016, p. 47–65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Towfigh, E, Goerg, S, Gloeckner, A, Leifeld, P, Llorente-Sauger, A, Bade, S & Kurschilgen, C 2016, 'Do direct-democratic procedures lead to higher acceptance than political representation?', Public Choice, vol. 167, no. 1-2, pp. 47–65. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11127-016-0330-y

APA

Towfigh, E., Goerg, S., Gloeckner, A., Leifeld, P., Llorente-Sauger, A., Bade, S., & Kurschilgen, C. (2016). Do direct-democratic procedures lead to higher acceptance than political representation? Public Choice, 167(1-2), 47–65. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11127-016-0330-y

Vancouver

Towfigh E, Goerg S, Gloeckner A, Leifeld P, Llorente-Sauger A, Bade S et al. Do direct-democratic procedures lead to higher acceptance than political representation? Public Choice. 2016 May 11;167(1-2):47–65. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11127-016-0330-y

Author

Towfigh, Emanuel ; Goerg, Sebastian ; Gloeckner, Andreas ; Leifeld, Philip ; Llorente-Sauger, Aniol ; Bade, Sophie ; Kurschilgen, Carlos. / Do direct-democratic procedures lead to higher acceptance than political representation?. In: Public Choice. 2016 ; Vol. 167, No. 1-2. pp. 47–65.

BibTeX

@article{1edb0d5dd2244e468e05886fba0a603b,
title = "Do direct-democratic procedures lead to higher acceptance than political representation?",
abstract = "Do direct-democratic decisions meet more acceptance than decisions arrived at through representative procedures? We conduct an experimental online vignette study with a German sample to investigate how voters{\textquoteright} acceptance of a political decision depends on the decision-making procedure. For a set of different topics, we investigate how acceptance varies depending on whether the decision is the result of a direct-democratic institution, a party in a representative democracy, or an expert committee. Our results show that for important topics, a direct-democratic decision results in higher acceptance; this finding particularly holds for those who have a different opinion than the decision outcome. However, if the topic is of limited importance to the voters, their acceptance does not differ between the mechanisms. Our results imply that a combination of representative democracy and direct democracy, conditional on the distribution of issue importance among the electorate, may be optimal with regard to acceptance of political decisions.",
author = "Emanuel Towfigh and Sebastian Goerg and Andreas Gloeckner and Philip Leifeld and Aniol Llorente-Sauger and Sophie Bade and Carlos Kurschilgen",
year = "2016",
month = may,
day = "11",
doi = "10.1007/s11127-016-0330-y",
language = "English",
volume = "167",
pages = "47–65",
journal = "Public Choice",
issn = "0048-5829",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "1-2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do direct-democratic procedures lead to higher acceptance than political representation?

AU - Towfigh, Emanuel

AU - Goerg, Sebastian

AU - Gloeckner, Andreas

AU - Leifeld, Philip

AU - Llorente-Sauger, Aniol

AU - Bade, Sophie

AU - Kurschilgen, Carlos

PY - 2016/5/11

Y1 - 2016/5/11

N2 - Do direct-democratic decisions meet more acceptance than decisions arrived at through representative procedures? We conduct an experimental online vignette study with a German sample to investigate how voters’ acceptance of a political decision depends on the decision-making procedure. For a set of different topics, we investigate how acceptance varies depending on whether the decision is the result of a direct-democratic institution, a party in a representative democracy, or an expert committee. Our results show that for important topics, a direct-democratic decision results in higher acceptance; this finding particularly holds for those who have a different opinion than the decision outcome. However, if the topic is of limited importance to the voters, their acceptance does not differ between the mechanisms. Our results imply that a combination of representative democracy and direct democracy, conditional on the distribution of issue importance among the electorate, may be optimal with regard to acceptance of political decisions.

AB - Do direct-democratic decisions meet more acceptance than decisions arrived at through representative procedures? We conduct an experimental online vignette study with a German sample to investigate how voters’ acceptance of a political decision depends on the decision-making procedure. For a set of different topics, we investigate how acceptance varies depending on whether the decision is the result of a direct-democratic institution, a party in a representative democracy, or an expert committee. Our results show that for important topics, a direct-democratic decision results in higher acceptance; this finding particularly holds for those who have a different opinion than the decision outcome. However, if the topic is of limited importance to the voters, their acceptance does not differ between the mechanisms. Our results imply that a combination of representative democracy and direct democracy, conditional on the distribution of issue importance among the electorate, may be optimal with regard to acceptance of political decisions.

U2 - 10.1007/s11127-016-0330-y

DO - 10.1007/s11127-016-0330-y

M3 - Article

VL - 167

SP - 47

EP - 65

JO - Public Choice

JF - Public Choice

SN - 0048-5829

IS - 1-2

ER -