Dissociating two forms of auditory distraction in a novel Stroop serial recall experiment. / Hughes, R.W.; Marsh, John E.

In: Auditory Perception and Cognition, Vol. 2, No. 3, 2019, p. 129-142.

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Dissociating two forms of auditory distraction in a novel Stroop serial recall experiment. / Hughes, R.W.; Marsh, John E.

In: Auditory Perception and Cognition, Vol. 2, No. 3, 2019, p. 129-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Hughes, R.W. ; Marsh, John E. / Dissociating two forms of auditory distraction in a novel Stroop serial recall experiment. In: Auditory Perception and Cognition. 2019 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 129-142.

BibTeX

@article{3665def785e64beb8230667c22461176,
title = "Dissociating two forms of auditory distraction in a novel Stroop serial recall experiment",
abstract = "We report a dissociation of two forms of auditory distraction within a single repeated-measures experiment using a novel Stroop serial recall task in which participants were oriented either to serially recall six color-words (low task-load condition) or the incongruent colors in which those words were presented (high task-load condition). The disruption of serial recall due to a single deviation in the voice delivering a sequence of task-irrelevant speech tokens (the deviation effect) was replicated in the low task-load condition but eliminated in the high task-load condition. In contrast, the disruption of serial recall by continuously changing compared to a repeating sound (the changing-state effect) did not differ according to task-load. The results provide further support for a duplex-mechanism account of auditory distraction: Disruption due to attentional diversion (cf. the deviation effect) is modulated by levels of focal task-engagement whereas interference-by-process (cf. changing-state effect)—in which the processing of the sound conflicts with seriation processes involved in task performance—is not.",
author = "R.W. Hughes and Marsh, {John E}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/25742442.2020.1760757",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "129--142",
journal = "Auditory Perception and Cognition",
issn = "2574-2442",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dissociating two forms of auditory distraction in a novel Stroop serial recall experiment

AU - Hughes, R.W.

AU - Marsh, John E

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - We report a dissociation of two forms of auditory distraction within a single repeated-measures experiment using a novel Stroop serial recall task in which participants were oriented either to serially recall six color-words (low task-load condition) or the incongruent colors in which those words were presented (high task-load condition). The disruption of serial recall due to a single deviation in the voice delivering a sequence of task-irrelevant speech tokens (the deviation effect) was replicated in the low task-load condition but eliminated in the high task-load condition. In contrast, the disruption of serial recall by continuously changing compared to a repeating sound (the changing-state effect) did not differ according to task-load. The results provide further support for a duplex-mechanism account of auditory distraction: Disruption due to attentional diversion (cf. the deviation effect) is modulated by levels of focal task-engagement whereas interference-by-process (cf. changing-state effect)—in which the processing of the sound conflicts with seriation processes involved in task performance—is not.

AB - We report a dissociation of two forms of auditory distraction within a single repeated-measures experiment using a novel Stroop serial recall task in which participants were oriented either to serially recall six color-words (low task-load condition) or the incongruent colors in which those words were presented (high task-load condition). The disruption of serial recall due to a single deviation in the voice delivering a sequence of task-irrelevant speech tokens (the deviation effect) was replicated in the low task-load condition but eliminated in the high task-load condition. In contrast, the disruption of serial recall by continuously changing compared to a repeating sound (the changing-state effect) did not differ according to task-load. The results provide further support for a duplex-mechanism account of auditory distraction: Disruption due to attentional diversion (cf. the deviation effect) is modulated by levels of focal task-engagement whereas interference-by-process (cf. changing-state effect)—in which the processing of the sound conflicts with seriation processes involved in task performance—is not.

U2 - 10.1080/25742442.2020.1760757

DO - 10.1080/25742442.2020.1760757

M3 - Article

VL - 2

SP - 129

EP - 142

JO - Auditory Perception and Cognition

JF - Auditory Perception and Cognition

SN - 2574-2442

IS - 3

ER -