Developing a Public Interest School of Management. / Ferlie, Ewan; McGivern, Gerry; de Moraes, Ailson.

Egham, Surrey : The School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London, 2008. (School of Management Working Papers).

Research output: Working paper

Published

Standard

Developing a Public Interest School of Management. / Ferlie, Ewan; McGivern, Gerry; de Moraes, Ailson.

Egham, Surrey : The School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London, 2008. (School of Management Working Papers).

Research output: Working paper

Harvard

Ferlie, E, McGivern, G & de Moraes, A 2008 'Developing a Public Interest School of Management' School of Management Working Papers, The School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham, Surrey. https://doi.org/SoM0804

APA

Ferlie, E., McGivern, G., & de Moraes, A. (2008). Developing a Public Interest School of Management. (School of Management Working Papers). The School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London. https://doi.org/SoM0804

Vancouver

Ferlie E, McGivern G, de Moraes A. Developing a Public Interest School of Management. Egham, Surrey: The School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London. 2008 Aug 20. (School of Management Working Papers). https://doi.org/SoM0804

Author

Ferlie, Ewan ; McGivern, Gerry ; de Moraes, Ailson. / Developing a Public Interest School of Management. Egham, Surrey : The School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London, 2008. (School of Management Working Papers).

BibTeX

@techreport{e9981366bee245ffbe9d1e507b0717ef,
title = "Developing a Public Interest School of Management",
abstract = "This {\textquoteleft}thinkpiece{\textquoteright} paper contributes to the recent {\textquoteleft}Business School Business{\textquoteright} debate by examining whether an alternative form of the Business School – specifically, the public interest model – can be created. Current criticisms of conventional Business Schools are reviewed and alternative models explored. We take some examples from our own field of health management research and define the public interest School model in more detail than in previous accounts and compare and contrast it with other models of the reformed Business School. We identify certain conditions in which this form is more likely to succeed and suggest a future empirical research agenda.",
keywords = "Public, Business, Management, Educational, Professionalisation, Reform",
author = "Ewan Ferlie and Gerry McGivern and {de Moraes}, Ailson",
note = "The School of Management Working Paper Series is published to circulate the results of on-going research to a wider audience and to facilitate intellectual exchange and debate. The papers have been through a refereeing process and will subsequently be published in a revised form. Requests for permission to reproduce any article or part of the Working Paper should be sent to the publisher of this series.<br /> The School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London has over 65 academic staff who are organised into different research groups. Currently research groups include:<br /> Accounting, Finance and Economics<br /> Strategy and International Business<br /> Marketing<br /> Technology and Information Management<br /> Organisation Studies and Human Resource Management<br /> Public Services Management<br /> The School also has about 60 research students attached to the various research groups. A strong theme of research in the School is its international and comparative focus.",
year = "2008",
month = aug,
day = "20",
doi = "SoM0804",
language = "English",
series = "School of Management Working Papers",
publisher = "The School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London",
type = "WorkingPaper",
institution = "The School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London",

}

RIS

TY - UNPB

T1 - Developing a Public Interest School of Management

AU - Ferlie, Ewan

AU - McGivern, Gerry

AU - de Moraes, Ailson

N1 - The School of Management Working Paper Series is published to circulate the results of on-going research to a wider audience and to facilitate intellectual exchange and debate. The papers have been through a refereeing process and will subsequently be published in a revised form. Requests for permission to reproduce any article or part of the Working Paper should be sent to the publisher of this series.<br /> The School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London has over 65 academic staff who are organised into different research groups. Currently research groups include:<br /> Accounting, Finance and Economics<br /> Strategy and International Business<br /> Marketing<br /> Technology and Information Management<br /> Organisation Studies and Human Resource Management<br /> Public Services Management<br /> The School also has about 60 research students attached to the various research groups. A strong theme of research in the School is its international and comparative focus.

PY - 2008/8/20

Y1 - 2008/8/20

N2 - This ‘thinkpiece’ paper contributes to the recent ‘Business School Business’ debate by examining whether an alternative form of the Business School – specifically, the public interest model – can be created. Current criticisms of conventional Business Schools are reviewed and alternative models explored. We take some examples from our own field of health management research and define the public interest School model in more detail than in previous accounts and compare and contrast it with other models of the reformed Business School. We identify certain conditions in which this form is more likely to succeed and suggest a future empirical research agenda.

AB - This ‘thinkpiece’ paper contributes to the recent ‘Business School Business’ debate by examining whether an alternative form of the Business School – specifically, the public interest model – can be created. Current criticisms of conventional Business Schools are reviewed and alternative models explored. We take some examples from our own field of health management research and define the public interest School model in more detail than in previous accounts and compare and contrast it with other models of the reformed Business School. We identify certain conditions in which this form is more likely to succeed and suggest a future empirical research agenda.

KW - Public

KW - Business

KW - Management

KW - Educational

KW - Professionalisation

KW - Reform

U2 - SoM0804

DO - SoM0804

M3 - Working paper

T3 - School of Management Working Papers

BT - Developing a Public Interest School of Management

PB - The School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London

CY - Egham, Surrey

ER -