Controlling working time on the ward and on the line. / Wise, S.; Smith, C.; Valsecchi, R.; Mueller, F.; Gabe, Jonathan.

In: Employee Relations, Vol. 29, No. 4, 2007, p. 352-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Published

Standard

Controlling working time on the ward and on the line. / Wise, S.; Smith, C.; Valsecchi, R.; Mueller, F.; Gabe, Jonathan.

In: Employee Relations, Vol. 29, No. 4, 2007, p. 352-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Wise, S, Smith, C, Valsecchi, R, Mueller, F & Gabe, J 2007, 'Controlling working time on the ward and on the line', Employee Relations, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 352-366. https://doi.org/10.1108/01425450710759190

APA

Wise, S., Smith, C., Valsecchi, R., Mueller, F., & Gabe, J. (2007). Controlling working time on the ward and on the line. Employee Relations, 29(4), 352-366. https://doi.org/10.1108/01425450710759190

Vancouver

Wise S, Smith C, Valsecchi R, Mueller F, Gabe J. Controlling working time on the ward and on the line. Employee Relations. 2007;29(4):352-366. https://doi.org/10.1108/01425450710759190

Author

Wise, S. ; Smith, C. ; Valsecchi, R. ; Mueller, F. ; Gabe, Jonathan. / Controlling working time on the ward and on the line. In: Employee Relations. 2007 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 352-366.

BibTeX

@article{3d88d590ff6c45db91d3b4771296f968,
title = "Controlling working time on the ward and on the line",
abstract = "Purpose – The purpose of this article is to assess whether tele-nursing in Scotland (NHS24), when compared with traditional face-to-face nursing, facilitates greater employee control over working time and therefore a potentially better work-life balance.Design/methodology/approach – The article draws on evidence from two independent research projects; a survey of 64 ward nurses and midwives, which involved face-to-face interviews; and a field study of tele-nursing in a large site in Scotland, using interviews and observations of 15 nurse advisors or tele-nurses.Findings – Three elements of work organisation are central in shaping nurses' working hours and their control over the balance between their work and their home life: the management of working hours; the degree of mutual dependency of nurses within teams; and the nature of patient care.Research limitations/implications – The two pieces of research reported offer a strong basis for comparative study. However, the two projects were designed independently, though research questions overlapped and one researcher conducted the field work in both settings; there is an imbalance in the number of interviews conducted in each setting; and the nurse advisor interviewees are of the same clinical grade, whereas a variety of grades and clinical areas are represented among the hospital nurse interviewees.Originality/value – This is the first study of work-life balance amongst tele-nurses. The research demonstrates that call centre work has rationalised, depersonalised and yet enabled more {"}control{"} by nurses over their work-life balance, while paradoxically offering less autonomy in their task environment. In conventional work settings professional values make it difficult for nurses to disengage from the workplace.",
author = "S. Wise and C. Smith and R. Valsecchi and F. Mueller and Jonathan Gabe",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1108/01425450710759190",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "352--366",
journal = "Employee Relations",
issn = "0142-5455",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Controlling working time on the ward and on the line

AU - Wise, S.

AU - Smith, C.

AU - Valsecchi, R.

AU - Mueller, F.

AU - Gabe, Jonathan

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Purpose – The purpose of this article is to assess whether tele-nursing in Scotland (NHS24), when compared with traditional face-to-face nursing, facilitates greater employee control over working time and therefore a potentially better work-life balance.Design/methodology/approach – The article draws on evidence from two independent research projects; a survey of 64 ward nurses and midwives, which involved face-to-face interviews; and a field study of tele-nursing in a large site in Scotland, using interviews and observations of 15 nurse advisors or tele-nurses.Findings – Three elements of work organisation are central in shaping nurses' working hours and their control over the balance between their work and their home life: the management of working hours; the degree of mutual dependency of nurses within teams; and the nature of patient care.Research limitations/implications – The two pieces of research reported offer a strong basis for comparative study. However, the two projects were designed independently, though research questions overlapped and one researcher conducted the field work in both settings; there is an imbalance in the number of interviews conducted in each setting; and the nurse advisor interviewees are of the same clinical grade, whereas a variety of grades and clinical areas are represented among the hospital nurse interviewees.Originality/value – This is the first study of work-life balance amongst tele-nurses. The research demonstrates that call centre work has rationalised, depersonalised and yet enabled more "control" by nurses over their work-life balance, while paradoxically offering less autonomy in their task environment. In conventional work settings professional values make it difficult for nurses to disengage from the workplace.

AB - Purpose – The purpose of this article is to assess whether tele-nursing in Scotland (NHS24), when compared with traditional face-to-face nursing, facilitates greater employee control over working time and therefore a potentially better work-life balance.Design/methodology/approach – The article draws on evidence from two independent research projects; a survey of 64 ward nurses and midwives, which involved face-to-face interviews; and a field study of tele-nursing in a large site in Scotland, using interviews and observations of 15 nurse advisors or tele-nurses.Findings – Three elements of work organisation are central in shaping nurses' working hours and their control over the balance between their work and their home life: the management of working hours; the degree of mutual dependency of nurses within teams; and the nature of patient care.Research limitations/implications – The two pieces of research reported offer a strong basis for comparative study. However, the two projects were designed independently, though research questions overlapped and one researcher conducted the field work in both settings; there is an imbalance in the number of interviews conducted in each setting; and the nurse advisor interviewees are of the same clinical grade, whereas a variety of grades and clinical areas are represented among the hospital nurse interviewees.Originality/value – This is the first study of work-life balance amongst tele-nurses. The research demonstrates that call centre work has rationalised, depersonalised and yet enabled more "control" by nurses over their work-life balance, while paradoxically offering less autonomy in their task environment. In conventional work settings professional values make it difficult for nurses to disengage from the workplace.

U2 - 10.1108/01425450710759190

DO - 10.1108/01425450710759190

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 352

EP - 366

JO - Employee Relations

JF - Employee Relations

SN - 0142-5455

IS - 4

ER -